Hermelinda Rivas Rodriguez Bibliography

5

Risk for psychological distress among cancer patients with a familial history of Indian Residential School attendance: Results from the 2008-10 First Nations Regional Health Survey:

Mrs. Maike van Niekerk*1 and Dr. Amy Bombay2

1Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada;2Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

Aboriginal peoples have been and continue to be subjected to multiple traumas and stressors that contribute to their greater risk for a variety of health and social problems. Among these health issues, cancer has been identified as the third leading cause of death in the First Nations population, and survival rates are lower because many are not diagnosed until it is too late. Due to the high prevalence and mortality rates of cancer, its diagnosis and treatment commonly evoke extreme psychological distress that can have significant implications for treatment and recovery. Having a greater understanding of risk factors that contribute to individual differences in psychological responses to cancer will help identify vulnerable populations and facilitate the development of culturally appropriate interventions. The present study assessed how familial Indian Residential School (IRS) attendance is linked with psychological distress among those with and without cancer in a representative sample of First Nations adults living on-reserve. Statistical analyses were carried out using data from the 2008-10 First Nations Regional Heath Survey (RHS), a representative survey of 4,934 First Nations living on-reserve from across Canada (excluding Nunavut). Analyses revealed that having a parent who attended IRS put First Nations adults diagnosed with cancer at greater risk for psychological distress relative to those without this family history. These findings point to the need for culturally safe cancer care for First Nations individuals and communities that have been affected by Residential Schools and other historical trauma events.

6

Does knowledge of diagnosis really affect rates of depression in cancer patients?

Dr. Éva Kállay, Dr. Sebastian Pintea and Dr. Csaba László Dégi*

Babes - Bolyai University, Cluj - Napoca, Romania

Purpose: The major objective of the present study was to investigate potential demographic and intrapersonal moderators of the relationship between knowing the cancer diagnosis and the level of depression experienced.

Methods: The present research has a transversal comparative repeated cross-sectional design (2006–2014), sampling following the proportional quota method. Research was conducted in the four major oncological institutes in Romania, obtaining a national sample of cancer patients, maintaining gender and ethnic rates, and permitting the investigation of the stability of the results from one assessment to the other.

Results: Results indicate that in the Romanian context, knowing the diagnosis is associated with a lower level of depression than not knowing the diagnosis, the results being similar in both assessments (2006–2014). Furthermore, from the explored demographic factors (gender, residence, age, and education), only age has a main effect upon depression (depression increasing with age), while education is the only factor from those analysed, which has a moderator effect. Regarding the analysed intra-individual variables, only dysfunctional attitudes, emotion-focused coping, and lack of emotional support from the family have main effects upon the level of depression (i.e., higher levels of dysfunctional attitudes, emotion-focused coping, and loneliness are associated with higher levels of depression), while neither of them has a moderator effect on the relationship between knowing the diagnosis and depression.

Conclusions: These results are important in the improvement of the doctor–patient relationship, the management of cancer-related distress, and implicitly for the course of illness.

Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research. Grant Number: PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0011.

7

Psychological stress in geriatric patients with urological tumours in acute treatment:

Dr. Desiree Louise Draeger*, Dr. Chris Protzel and Prof. Oliver Hakenberg

Department of Urology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany

Background: Two-thirds of all cancer cases involve patients who are older than 65 years, yet diagnosis, treatment and care of cancer in this age group are poorly studied. The psychological stress of urological cancer patients resulting from cancer diagnosis correlates with treatment side effects such as loss of body integrity, sexual or bladder function. Regarding the specific psycho-oncological problems in elderly patients, data are sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate the stress situation of elderly patients with urological tumours using standardized screening questionnaires and the use of such screening questionnaires in the inpatient psychosocial treatment program.

Methods: Prospective analysis of patients (≥65 years) with urological tumours (n = 162) who underwent a surgical treatment or chemotherapy. Assessment of stress in patients using standardized screening questionnaires (NCCN Distress Thermometer and Hornheider SI) and integration with inpatient mental health care programs.

Results: The average stress level was 4.4. According to the survey, 28% of the patients (45/162) had care needs. The majority of these (48%) also communicated. 48% being in need of care of in- or outpatient psychosocial care.

Conclusions: There is a significant number of elderly urological cancer patients with increased psychological stress and a consecutive need of psychosocial care. An interdisciplinary and inter-professional collaboration is essential to treat elderly cancer patients well. The integration of the measurement of psychological distress as an evaluation of the treatment of older patients is a step forward for patients with potentially life-threatening urological diseases.

8

The psychosocial stress situation in female patients with superficial bladder carcinoma:

Dr. Desiree Louise Draeger*, Dr. Chris Protzel and Prof. Oliver Hakenberg

Department of Urology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany

Background: About 7000 women get the diagnosis “bladder cancer” each year in Germany. Malignancy of the urinary bladder is in 14th position in the frequency range of cancer in women. The average age at initial diagnosis is 74 years. Recent studies show that women have a worse prognosis caused by a late diagnosis. The gold standard in the treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma is the complete transurethral resection of the tumour. The current study situation with regard to the psychosocial situation of patients with superficial bladder cancer does not include gender-specific assessments. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the stress situation of female bladder cancer patients by screening questionnaires.

Methods: A prospective analysis of female bladder cancer patients with superficial tumours (pTa/pT1, n = 42, mean age 72 years) using validated and standardized questionnaires for stress and psychosocial care needs was done (Hornheider SI and Distress Thermometer).

Results: 51% of female patients have a burden of ≥ 5 which indicated a potential clinically relevant psychological distress. The mean stress level was 4.5 (STD 2.5). There were mostly reports of emotional stress factors: anxiety and nervousness (37%), pain and sleep (32%) and sorrow (29%).

Conclusions: Compared to similar studies in men with bladder cancer, women with bladder cancer experience significantly more psychosocial stress than men. They complain mainly of emotional stressors, whereas male patients are more likely to report somatic stressors. This prospective study emphasizes the relevance of psychosocial screening and the need for psychosocial counselling and care.

9

The relevance of psychosocial care in patients with penile cancer:

Dr. Desiree Louise Draeger*, Dr. Chris Protzel and Prof. Oliver Hakenberg

Department of Urology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany

Background: The penile cancer is a rare highly aggressive tumour entity. The psychological stress of patients with penis carcinoma arises from the cancer diagnosis per se and the correlating with tumour suffering side effects (loss of body integrity and sexual function). In addition, there is cancer-specific distress e.g. fear of metastasis, progress, recurrence or death. Studies on the psychosocial stress of penile carcinoma patents are rare. This study investigated the stress situation of patients with penile malignancies using screening questionnaires and integration with inpatient mental health care programs.

Methods: Prospective analysis of patients with penile carcinoma (n = 33) who underwent a surgical treatment or chemotherapy in the period between 06/2014 and 12/2015. Assessment of stress in patients with penile cancer using standardized screening questionnaires (Distress Thermometer (DT) and Hornheider SI (HSI)) and integration with inpatient mental health care programs.

Results: The average stress level was 4.1 (DT; STD 2,2). 42% of the patients showed an elevation care needs. All affected patients received inpatient psychosocial care. The main stressors were sorrow (44%), micturition (40%), fear (36%) and exhaustion (32%).

Conclusions: Patients with penile cancer have, due to the often mutilating surgery, increased psychological stress and consequently increased psychosocial care needs. Therefore, emotional stress should be recognized and support provided. This illustrates the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in cancer treatment.

10

A qualitative research study to explore the patients' experience of returning home following allogeneic stem cell transplantation for haematological malignancy.

Dr. Liz Dunn*

Guys and St Thomas NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom

Background/Purpose: Globally, 10 000 people a year are treated with Stem Cell Transplant (SCT) for haematological malignancy following arduous chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. The purpose of this research is to explore the lived experience of fifteen men and women treated with allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) for haematological malignancy.

Method: The study followed an interpretive phenomenological methodology using semi-structured interviews. Fifteen participants aged between 22–68 years were purposively recruited from two specialist treatment centres and were interviewed within three months to one year post SCT between April and September 2013. Data were analysed using interpretive phenomenological methodology to gain insights into their lived experience including their personal and social experience of the world following treatment.

Results: Two overarching concepts emerged from the data: The Immediacy of Illness and Existential Crisis and The Recovery Journey. The Immediacy of Illness and Existential Crisis illustrates the participant's experiences of critical events in relation to illness and the Recovery Journey exemplifies the subsequent challenges and enduring uncertainty they face including threats to their own mortality. Participants suffer major disruption to their lives physically, psychosocially and emotionally as a result of illness without a sense of when they may resume the normality of their former life.

Conclusions: Ambiguity and uncertainty characterise the illness and recovery journey for those with haematological malignancy. Whilst participants have access to specialist teams, there are opportunities for health and social care professionals to provide more support for individual's returning home after prolonged hospitalisation and in the months that follow.

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CARDIAC REHABILITATION TO INCREASE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG CANCER PATIENTS: IS IT FEASIBLE AND ACCEPTABLE?

Dr Gill Hubbard*1, Dr Richard Adams2, Dr Anna Campbell3, Dr Lisa Kidd4, Prof Stephen Leslie5, Mrs Julie Munro1, Prof Angus Watson5, Prof Ronan O'Carroll1, Prof Sally Haw1,6 and Prof Shaun Treweek7

1University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom;2Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom;3Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;4RGU, Aberdeen, United Kingdom;5NHS Highlands, Inverness, United Kingdom;6Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;7University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom

Background: There is strong evidence of exercise to aid recovery from cancer and secondary prevention. Yet colorectal cancer survivors are currently not meeting the recommended physical activity levels associated with improving the chances of survival and quality of life. We evaluated whether referral of colorectal cancer patients to cardiac rehabilitation is a feasible and acceptable exercise intervention.

Methods: We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study supplemented with an economic evaluation. At baseline 41 post-surgical colorectal cancer patients, recruited from 3 hospital wards, were randomly assigned into two groups: an intervention group which received cardiac rehabilitation alongside cardiac patients and a no rehabilitation control group. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise trial parameters indicative of intervention feasibility and acceptability. 38 patients (colorectal cancer and cardiac) and 8 clinicians (colorectal cancer and cardiac) participated in interviews/focus groups and data were analysed thematically.

Results: Barriers to exercise for post-surgical colorectal cancer patients were protracted recoveries from surgery, on-going treatments and poor mobility. No adverse events were reported, suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation provides a safe exercise environment for cancer patients. Out of pocket expenses were small (£50). Cardiac rehabilitation increased cancer patients’ confidence and motivation to exercise and offered peer support. Cardiac and cancer patients found exercising together acceptable.

Conclusions: Cardiac rehabilitation for colorectal cancer patients is feasible and acceptable, thereby challenging disease-specific rehabilitation models. We need a better understanding of the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation for increasing physical activity to improve survival and quality of life of cancer patients.

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RAISING ADOLESCENT CANCER AWARENESS AND CANCER COMMUNICATION IN FAMILIES

Dr Gill Hubbard*1, Dr Richard Kyle2, Mrs Iona Stoddart3, Prof Liz Forbat4, Prof Richard Neal5, Prof Ronan O'Carroll1 and Prof Sally Haw1

1University of Stirling, Inverness, United Kingdom;2Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;3Teenage Cancer Trust, London, United Kingdom;4Australian Catholic University, Canberra, Australia;5Bangor University, Bangor, United Kingdom

Introduction: People who have greater awareness of signs and symptoms that might be suggestive of cancer are more likely to seek medical help quickly. If the cancer is detected early then a person has a much better chance of living a long and healthy life. Little is known about psycho-educational interventions to improve teenage cancer awareness and cancer communication.

Methods: At baseline 2,173 12/13 year olds from 20 schools were randomly assigned into two groups: an intervention schools group which received a 50 minute psycho-educational presentation to raise cancer awareness and a control schools group. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine differences in the number of cancer warning signs recognised by teenagers and cancer communication in intervention schools compared to control schools.

Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the number of cancer warning signs recognised by teenagers in intervention schools compared to teenagers in control schools at 2-week follow-up (β 0.689, p < 0.001, CI 0.351–1.028) and 6-month follow-up (β 0.471, p = 0.012, CI 0.103–0.838). Teenagers in intervention schools were two and a half times more likely to discuss cancer at 2-week follow-up compared to teenagers in control schools (β 0.992 p = 0.014, CI 0.260–1.725, OR 2.698, 1.297–5.613).

Conclusions: School-based psycho-educational interventions are easy to deliver, require little resource and improve teenage cancer awareness and cancer communication. We need more research to find out if the intervention is able to shift health behaviours such as self-examination and cancer screening among parents/grandparents.

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The Case for Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women

Mrs Lorna Larsen*

Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan), Woodstock, Canada

Background: Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan) has been raising breast cancer awareness on college and university campuses in Canada since 2017. Addressing late diagnosis, Team Shan has developed a comprehensive public awareness model to help close the gap in breast cancer awareness and increase early detection of breast cancer in young women.

Methods: Regular systematic reviews have been undertaken to access the need for young women to be aware of their breast cancer risk and an awareness campaign model developed to reach this population at risk.

The Team Shan model has been evaluated using pre and post campaign questionnaires with young women on post-secondary school campuses.

Results: Responses have reported on the effectiveness of health promotion strategies, breast cancer risk and knowledge levels, campaign take home messages, self-care action taken and information sharing. Feedback from young women diagnosed with breast cancer post campaigns has also been received.

Conclusions: To improve early detection rates, this target population must be aware of the signs and symptoms of breast cancer in order to self detect this disease. Breast cancer can be effectively treated if detected early and an effective health education campaign can help reduce the number of deaths due to breast cancer.

Young women need information and awareness about their risk of breast cancer. Knowledge of symptoms and self-help strategies provide young women with the opportunity for self detection and earlier medical diagnosis. The multi-faceted approach undertaken by Team Shan addresses these needs.

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'Animated Shan'…a social media strategy to reach young women with their breast cancer risk and breast health information

Mrs Lorna Larsen*

Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan), Woodstock, Canada

Background: The Team Shan Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women (Team Shan) is a Canadian charity dedicated to reaching young women with their breast cancer risk and breast health information. Named after Shanna (Shan) Larsen, Team Shan has incorporated Shan's personal breast cancer story into an effective breast cancer awareness model. Young women have responded and asked for ‘more’!!

Methods: Systematic reviews have been undertaken to access the breast cancer messaging needs for young women. A comprehensive social marketing model was developed to reach this population at risk. Social media has been a vital component of the model and the development of ‘animated Shan,’ a toon character, has helped make a difference in transferring knowledge to young women. 'Animated Shan' has been utilized in the development of social media infographics to reach the target population.

The Team Shan campaign model has been evaluated using pre and post campaign questionnaires with young women on post secondary school campuses across Canada.

Results: Shan's Story has consistently resonated with young women. Campaign evaluations have concluded that the “use of a specific person (Shanna) and her story appealed to the target group and made a difference in communicating the message to young women.”

Preliminary social media analytics show promising results for the use of ‘animated Shan.’

Conclusions: Team Shan breast cancer awareness activities are facilitated in Shan's memory. Shan's dream was to teach. Through ‘animated Shan,’ Shan's spirit continues to teach and make a difference for young women following in her footsteps.

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The effect of singing on mood, stress, cortisol, cytokine and neuropeptide activity in cancer patients and carers: who benefits most?

Dr Daisy Fancourt*1, Prof Aaron Williamon1, Dr Livia A. Carvalho2 and Prof Andrew Steptoe2

1Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College/Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music, London, United Kingdom;2Psychobiology Group, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom

Background: A previous study (Fancourt et al., ecancer, in press) showed that group singing could improve mood and stress, decrease stress hormones and increase immune activity in cancer carers, bereaved carers and patients. This paper will involve novel analyses of these data to explore the question of who benefits most from singing.

Methods: At baseline, 193 participants completed validated psychological scales assessing mental health, and before and after 1 hour of group singing, visual analogue mood scales, stress scales and saliva samples testing for cortisol, beta-endorphin, oxytocin and ten cytokines were taken.

Results: Improvements in stress, mood and increases in 7/10 cytokines were found across patients, carers and bereaved. However, patients, unlike carers and bereaved, did not have significant increases in sTNFr1 and both patients and carers had blunted increases in MCP1 and IL17. Psychobiological responses occurred regardless of how many rehearsals participants had previously attended. However, participants who had attended more singing sessions historically had wellbeing levels 20% higher than new participants and differences in baseline levels of cytokines IL4 and IL17. Psychological effects were less strong for older participants.

Conclusions: Overall, these data suggest that singing continues to have short-term psychobiological effects for people affected by cancer with evidence that responses are not attenuated by repetitive exposure. Data also suggest that long-term involvement can lead to changes in immune activity. Nevertheless, there are nuances in effects dependent on age, sex and status as a carer or patient that could guide the design of future studies and interventions.

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Stories That Heal: Using Digital Storytelling as a Psychosocial Intervention in Paediatric and Adolescent/Young Adult Cancer Care

Dr Catherine Laing*

University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

Background: The more sophisticated the science of childhood cancer becomes, the more obvious it is that curing the disease is only half the challenge. While much attention has been given to cure, more attention is needed in areas of care, as there can be as many psychosocial effects of therapy as there are physical effects. Digital storytelling is a medium through which children and adolescents/young adults can thoughtfully, purposefully, and impactfully tell their stories.

Methods: This was a qualitative study, employing a sophisticated method of research well documented under the umbrella of phenomenological studies: hermeneutics. Hermeneutic inquiry is described as the practice and theory of interpretation and understanding in human contexts.

Results: Fifteen participants created digital stories about their experiences with cancer, and participated in a semi-structured interview within two weeks of completion. Eleven interdisciplinary healthcare providers participated in a focus group wherein they watched the digital stories and discussed utility, transferability, impact, and other potential implications of this medium.

Conclusions Digital storytelling was shown to have the potential to mitigate suffering, and is an effective tool for the healthcare team as a way of providing insight and understanding into patients’ and families’ unique experiences with childhood cancer. It is a helpful tool to use to understand the challenges facing cancer patients, families, and oncology teams, and a way to work with patients and survivors who may typically not be inclined to participate in traditional approaches to psychosocial health.

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Prostate-cancer related concerns of men in the first year after localised prostate cancer diagnosis and decisions to seek help

Dr Melissa Hyde*1,2, Professor Robert Newton3,4, Professor Daniel Galvão3, Professor Robert Gardiner3,4,5, Dr Stefano Occhipinti1, Dr Anthony Lowe1,6, Professor Gary Wittert7 and Professor Suzanne Chambers1,2,3,4,6

1Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Southport, Australia;2Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;3Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia;4University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;5Department of Urology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia;6Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, St Leonards, Australia;7Freemasons Foundation Centre for Men's Health, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Background/Purpose: More men are now surviving prostate cancer; however, they are living with high and persistent symptom burdens often unaddressed in follow-up care. Although supportive care needs of prostate cancer survivors have been explored, patterns of men's help seeking to address unmet needs are poorly described. This study identifies sources of support utilised by men with localised prostate cancer in the first year after diagnosis and examines contributors to help seeking for men with unmet needs.

Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 331 patients from a population-based sample who were 12 months post-diagnosis (M = 9.6, SD = 1.9) was conducted. Support accessed, unmet supportive care needs, domain-specific quality of life and psychological distress were assessed.

Results: Overall, 82% of men reported unmet supportive care needs. Top five needs were sexuality (58%); prostate cancer-specific (57%); psychological (47%); physical and daily living (41%); and health system and information (31%). Professional support was most often sought from doctors (51%). Across most domains men who were older (p's ≤ 0.03), less well educated (p's ≤ 0.04), and more depressed (p's ≤ 0.05) were less likely to seek help for unmet needs. Greater sexual help seeking was related to better sexual function (p = 0.03), higher education (p ≤ 0.03) and less depression (p = 0.05).

Conclusions: Unmet supportive care needs are highly prevalent after localised prostate cancer diagnosis with older age, lower education, and higher depression apparent barriers to help seeking. Interventions that link across medicine, nursing and community-based peer support may be an accessible approach to meeting these needs.

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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer: A randomised controlled trial

Prof Suzanne Chambers*1,2,3,4,5,6, Dr Elizabeth Foley7, Ms Samantha Clutton2, Dr Melissa Legg1,2,6, Dr Stefano Occhipinti1, Associate Professor Martin Berry6,8, Professor Martin Stockler6,9,10, Professor Stephen Lepore11, Professor Mark Frydenberg6,12,13, Professor Robert Gardiner4,5,6,14, Professor Ian Davis6,15,16 and Associate Professor David Smith1,6,17

1Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Southport, Australia;2Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;3Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, St Leonards, Australia;4Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia;5University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;6Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer (ANZUP) Trials Group, Sydney, Australia;7Mind Potential, Sydney, Australia;8Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, Australia;9Concord Cancer Centre, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, Australia;10National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia;11Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, United States of America;12Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;13Department of Urology, Monash Health, Melbourne, Australia;14Department of Urology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia;15Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;16Eastern Health, Melbourne, Australia;17Cancer Council New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

Background: Advanced prostate cancer may be associated with substantial psychological distress but there is little data about effective interventions. A multi-state two-armed randomised controlled trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a tele-based mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) intervention for men with advanced prostate cancer.

Methods: Participants were recruited through clinicians in the Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group and from major treatment centres located in Queensland, New South Wales, Western Australia, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania. A total of 190 eligible men consented to participate in the trial and were randomly assigned to the tele-based MBCT intervention (n = 94) or a patient education group (n = 95). Self-administered questionnaires were sent to participants at four time points: baseline and at three, six, and nine months after recruitment and intervention commencement. Primary trial outcomes are psychological distress and cancer-specific distress. Secondary trial outcomes are health-related quality of life and benefit finding. Potential mediators of successful intervention outcomes include engagement with mindfulness and adherence to practice.

Results: At baseline, 39% of participants reported high psychological distress although only 10% were under current psychological care. Preliminary analyses of baseline data indicate that adjustment outcomes were associated with the following facets of mindfulness: non-judging of inner experience, acting with awareness, and non-reactivity to inner experience. Trial outcome data are currently being analysed and results will be presented.

Conclusions: Trial outcomes will be discussed with regard to models of psychological care and the feasibility of MBCT interventions for men with prostate cancer.

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Psychological predictors of the perceived need for psychosocial care in Romanian cancer patients

Mr Claudiu-Cristian Papasteri*

University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania

Background/Purpose: Oncology psychosocial screening and care are not yet well established in Romania, and a firm request by the patient is often mandatory in order to receive non-compulsory psychology services. Socio-cultural factors shaped both openness and access to psychosocial care such that improved uptake of services, and intervention targeting can be attained only by understanding patients’ need and desire for help.

Methods: A mixed sample of 250 adult cancer patients from the Bucharest Institute of Oncology completed a screening questionnaire battery consisting of Emotion Thermometers (ET), NHP, FACT-G, SCNS-SF34, and HADS, along with 14 questions regarding demographics and one regarding the present need for professional psychological care (counselling/psychotherapy). 76% of respondents were women, but neither age (t(97.65) = 1.04, p = .30), nor the declared need for psychological care (χ2(1) = 1.08, p = .30) differed significantly by gender. 35.6% (30% of men, 37.36% of women) reported their need for professional help.

Results: Both bidirectional selections using AIC/BIC and purposeful model selection pointed towards the same multiple logistic regression models. Distress (OR = 1.18, p < .001, 95% CI 1.05-1.34), anxiety (OR = 1.14, p < .001, 95% CI 1.05-1.24), unmet sexuality related supportive needs (OR = 1.16, p < .001, 95% CI 1.04-1.29), and work and financial disruptions attributable to disease (OR = 1.44, p < .0001, 95% CI 1.19-1.75) were the covariates selected for the final model, all of which predict a higher perceived need for psychological care.

Conclusions: Predicting the perceived need for psychological care can better aid patient group targeting, intervention delivery, and encourages a well-informed combined screening process for both distress and desire to receive professional help.

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Caregiving in the face of aversive cancer side effects: The difference compassion can make in caring for older people

Dr Lisa Reynolds*, Mr Benjamin Booker, Mr Yee Sing Lin, Miss Karen Chung and Associate Professor Nathan Consedine

The University Of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Background: Cancer treatment begins in medical settings—but friends and family provide longer term healthcare. Caregivers often deal with unpleasant tasks like toileting and changing soiled dressings. This experimental study investigated whether compassion might ameliorate disgust-generated withdrawal of caregiving in scenarios where younger/same/older age family and friends required help with aversive tasks related to cancer treatment.

Methods: 80 participants (Mean = 27 years) attended a laboratory session in which they were randomized to either compassion or control conditions before rating scenarios where friends or family of differing ages had cancer and required help with aversive care tasks. Participants then viewed a confederate participant undertaking unpleasant caregiving tasks and were given an opportunity to behaviourally demonstrate compassion by exchanging places.

Results: One way ANOVAs showed state compassion was successfully induced. While there were no group differences in willingness to care for younger or similarly aged family/friends, participants were less willing to help older friends than older family. Compassion ameliorated this effect on some tasks; participants in the compassion condition were more willing to help older friends with toileting (F(1,76) = 3.95, p = .050), change a bandage (F(1,76) = 2.81, p = .098), and replace a catheter (F(1,76) = 5.35, p = .023). Additionally, participants who reported ‘disgust’ while observing the confederate were less likely to trade places (Wald = 8.26, df = 1, p = .004).

Conclusions: Our findings are the first to suggest that compassion might sometimes ameliorate disgust-generated withdrawal of caregiving for older persons. Given the reliance of healthcare systems on informal care networks, this study may have important implications for how cancer care of older people is supported.

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Young People's Experience of Cancer in Ireland

Ms Lauren Deimling Johns*, Dr Natalie Hession and Allison Connolly

St. Luke's Radiation Oncology Network, Dublin, Ireland

Objectives: There is little consolidated information around the experience of young people who both currently have cancer and those who experience the long-term effects of childhood cancer here in Ireland. This research aims to provide rich data to inform practitioners, policy-makers as well as young people who have experienced cancer.

Methods: An online survey was developed by a team within a Radiation Oncology Hospital. Over 300 responses were collected online between January and May of 2015. Frequencies were collected to provide general and accessible statistics. A chi-square tests of independence were performed to examine the relation between young people diagnosed under the age of 18 and those diagnosed over 18 years of age to determine if unique needs exist, and if so, in what ways.

Results: Chi-square tests of independence indicate a significant difference between young people and adults in support for the preservation of fertility and the impact of cancer treatment on sexual activity and libido. Significant associations were found in questions of relational themes. Also, no statistically significant association regarding the provision of psychosocial support with both groups reporting being offered said services about half of the time.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that young adults may need further support in preserving their fertility, managing the impact of diagnosis and treatment on their sexual activity and libido, developing their sense of identity integrating their cancer experience and harnessing their potential for post traumatic growth. It also finds psychosocial support to be lacking in accessibility across age groups.

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Narrative Medicine: A Practical Application for Using Writing as a Clinical Intervention with Cancer Patients, Caregivers and the Clinicians that Care for Them.

Ms E. Angela Heller* and Ms Frances Eichholz Heller*

New York Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, United States

Narrative medicine is a term coined by Dr. Rita Charon at the Columbia University Medical Center in response to what she identified as a growing need for doctors and medical students to learn to incorporate in their practice the skills necessary to “read” and be moved by their patients’ illness narratives. These skills were akin to those that are developed by studying/analysing literature. It was found that those students and doctors who participated in learning these skills reported responding to patients’ stories with greater compassion and empathy.

The authors felt a need to go one step further: to hear the patients' and caregivers' voices in a similar forum and to help them to learn to “read” their own suffering. In response, a narrative writing workshop open to cancer patients, caregivers and staff was initiated in 2006 at this hospital. Writing about the experience of illness, patients discover the story of survival, move it from “talk” to the visible page where they recover, revise and control the meaning of what has happened to them. Combining staff, patients and their caregivers together in an ongoing workshop, better communication and understanding is fostered between all those involved in the struggle with chronic illness, creating a community based on trust and shared experience.

We propose to present our experience facilitating this group for over 10 years. The literature/poetry/prose/memoir that is used to stimulate discussion will be discussed along with the writing prompts that are used in the subsequent writing exercises assigned within each session.

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Guideline for Supportive Care in Oncology Orientation criteria: Who, when and why referring to psychologist/psychiatrist

Dr. Michel Reich*

Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille, France

Background: Health care professionals working in oncology have learned to work with psycho-oncology department. Nevertheless, they are not always familiar with which mental health professional they should refer to. Surveys tend to demonstrate that clinical criteria alert which would guide the orientation towards the adequate mental health professional either psychologists or psychiatrists are missing.

Method: A collaboration between the Francophone Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (AFSOS) and the French Society of Psycho-Oncology (SFPO), through the supervision and logistical framework of Regional Cancer Networks, was created in order to develop interregional workgroups, gather and pool specific guidelines for oncologic teams. Practical clinical guidelines for assessing orientation criteria for improving referral of cancer patients with psychological distress and/or psychiatric disorders to psychologist or psychiatrist working in psycho-oncology were elaborated. This guideline was created through a methodology based on literature review and summary, identification of existing tools (HADS, Po-Bado), several phone meetings of the workgroup to elaborate content, seek consensus and create an algorithm.

Results: These guidelines were presented, discussed and adjusted when necessary in workshops during supportive care guidelines validated during J2R plenary meeting in Nantes (FRANCE) in December 2015. Results are summarized in a practical algorithm.

Conclusions This guideline has been established in order to optimize referral's adequacy of cancer patient with psychological distress or psychiatric disorders to mental health care professionals. Practical recommendations for referral management following alert criteria have been highlighted and will be made available through the AFSOS (www.afsos.fr) and the SFPO (www.sfpo.fr) website.

27

Psychometric properties of a new tool for the assessment of Emotional Distress of Caregivers of advanced cancer patients/end of life: The scale DCED

Dr. Prof Joaquín T. Limonero*1, Dr Jorge Maté2, Dr Dolors Mateo1,3, Dr Jesús González-Barboteo4, Mrs Montserrat Bernaus5, Mrs Carme Casas6, Mrs Montserrat López5, Dr Agustina Sirgo7, Mrs Cruz Sánchez8, Mrs María-José Gómez-Romero9 and Mrs Silvia Viel10

1Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Stress and Health Rersearch Groupos (GIES), Faculty of Psychology. Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallés), Barcelona, Spain, Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallés), Spain;2Psycho-oncology Unit. Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL, Institut Català d'Oncologia, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain;3The 'Qualy' Observatory. WHO Collaborating Centre for Public Health Palliative Care Programmes. Institut Català d'Oncologia. Chair of Palliative Care, Universitat de Vic. L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain;4Palliative Care Service, Institut Català d'Oncologia. Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain;5Palliative Care Service, Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí. Sabadell (Barcelona). Spain, Sabadell (Barcelona), Spain;6Palliative Care Unit. Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa. Terrassa (Barcelona), Spain, Terrassa (Barcelona), Spain;7Psycho-oncoloy Unit, Univesrity Hospital San Joan. Reus (Tarragona), Spain, Reus (Tarragona), Spain;8Palliative Care Service, Fundació Hospital-Residència Sant Camil. Sant Pere de Ribes (Barcelona), Spain, Sant Pere de Ribes (Barcelona), Spain;9Psychology Department. Egarsat, Mutua de Accidentes de Trabajo y Enfermedades Profesionales de la Seguridad Social , núm. 276. Terrassa (Barcelona). Spain., Terrassa (Barcelona), Spain;10Member of Psychology Team, Societat Catalano-Balear de Cures Pal•liatives Barcelona, Spain, Barcelona, Spain

Purpose: To determine the psychometric properties and the clinical utility of the new tool Detection of Caregivers Emotional Distress (DCED) of advanced cancer patients attending in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU). DCED have two parts: the first contains three questions addressed to the caregiver: two related to mood state and coping perception and another that records the main concerns; the second part consists of an observation of external signs of emotional distress made by the health professional.

Methods: 102 caregivers of advanced cancer patients admitted to PCU participated in this study. The caregivers responded DCED and the following tools: Reduced Zarit Scale (RZS), Emotional Thermometer (ET), and Anxiety (A) and Depression (D) by analogue visual scale.

Results: Mean age of caregivers of patients were of 61.3 (SD 12.9). It was noted that 60.1% had moderate to severe emotional distress. The cut-off point for DCED evaluated by means of Receiver-Operating Curve (ROC) suggested that the best ROC curve is a value ≥ 10.5, with a specificity between 75% and 97% and a sensitivity between 68% and 83.3%. It was found positive and significant statistically intraclass correlations with ET, RZS, A and D. The internal consistency measured by alpha of Cronbach was .76.

Conclusions: The DCED present a good psychometric properties, is a useful and easy tool to use for the screening of emotional distress of caregivers. Our results justify the systematic use of DCED as a screening instrument in the clinical praxis and it allows deriving a specific professional if necessary.

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Physical symptom distress and psychological distress in Hong Kong Chinese breast cancer survivors: the role of illness perception

Ms Na Zhang*, Prof Richard Fielding and Dr Wendy Lam

School of Public Health, The University Of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Background/Purpose: Leventhal's common-sense model proposes symptom experience triggers individuals’ illness perception affecting illness adaptation. We tested if illness perception mediated the relationship between physical symptom distress and psychological distress.

Methods: Following breast cancer treatment 372/383 Hong Kong women completed baseline Illness perception (IPQ) and physical symptom distress (MSAS) measures. Anxiety and depression (HADS) were also assessed at baseline and one-year follow-up. Bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals were used to determine any indirect effects of illness perception on the physical symptom distress-psychological distress relationship.

Results: After adjusting for individual difference and baseline psychological distress, baseline physical symptom distress significantly predicted one-year anxiety (B = 1.15, P < 0.05) and depression (B = 0.86, P < 0.05). Three domains in illness perception, perceived seriousness, perceived illness duration, and symptom identity mediated baseline physical symptom distress and one-year post-baseline anxiety. The mediation effect accounted for 24.2%, 6.3% and 18.5% of total association, respectively. Perceived seriousness also mediated the relationship between baseline physical symptom distress and one-year post-baseline depression. Mediation explained 27.7% of total effect.

Conclusions: Physical symptom distress associated with negative illness perception, in turn increasing psychological distress. Women with greater physical symptom distress perceived illness as longer lasting, more serious, and perceived symptoms to reflect cancer. Negative illness beliefs led to greater psychological distress during cancer survivorship.

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Development of the Evidence-based Practice Learning Program for Oncology Nurses in Japan: A Pilot Study

Reiko Makabe*1, Ikumi Sato1, Tomomi Hasegawa2, Junko Yano3, Shukuko Watanabe4 and Suguru Kanno3

1Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan;2Shirakawa Kose General Hospital, Shirakawa, Japan;3Fukushima Home Palliative Care Clinic, Fukushima, Japan;4Southern Tohoku General Hospital, Koriyama, Japan

Background/Purpose: Japanese nurses at centre hospitals for cancer care had inadequate knowledge of evidence-based practice (EBP). As only few EBP leaning programs for oncology nurses are available in Japan, we planned to develop such a program to be used at centre hospitals for cancer care. This report focused on the program conducted in our program development process.

Methods: The participants were a convenience sample of Japanese nurses who work at centre hospitals for cancer care. The program was composed of five steps: 1) Overview of EBP, 2) Identify an EBP issues in cancer nursing care and search for evidence, 3) Find evidence of cancer care and plan to use the evidence into nursing practice, 4) Implement the plan, and 5) Evaluate outcomes and report findings. Data were collected by two questionnaires: 1) the Self Evaluation Scale on Research Utilization Competency for Clinical Nurses and 2) a Satisfaction Survey of the EBP Learning Program. This study was approved by the primary author's Institutional Review Board.

Results: Participants were six nurses providing care for cancer patients and families for years. They demonstrated their satisfaction of the programs as “some” or “strongly.” Then, we confirmed that the program was effective to learn EBP.

Conclusions This pilot study finds an effective EBP learning program that enable nurses to provide higher quality cancer care. Further projects need to evaluate and develop an effective EBP learning program in Japan.

The research was funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (grant no. MO 26463344).

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Psychological aspects of meaning-centered group psychotherapy: Spanish experience.

Mrs Clara Fraguell*1,2, Doctor Joaquin Timoteo Limonero2 and Doctor Francisco Gil2,3

1EAPS-Mutuam. Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain;2Stress and Health Research Group. Faculty of Psychology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain;3Psycho-Oncology Department, Institut Català d´Oncologia, L´Hospitalet, Barcelona, Spain

Background: A cancer diagnosis can be a disease with curative or palliative intent, but it is a treatable disease. Depression has been associated with reduced survival, probably related to the reduction of self care and compliance with treatment against cancer. Patients with a diagnosis of advanced cancer (stage III and IV) have a higher degree of complexity in relation to the control of physical and psychological symptoms. In order to improve adaptation to advanced disease, William Breitbart developed Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP), which has demonstrated its effectiveness in different groups of patients with advanced cancer.

Purpose: To identify emerging and constructed themes arising in applying Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) in patients with advanced cancer.

Methods: a mixed qualitative-quantitative analysis has been done based on transcription of 22 advanced cancer patients distributed in three groups who received MCGP.

Results: We have found six emerging themes in addition to the regular topics (n = 20) raised by the MCGP. Furthermore, in 65% of the subjects the comparison of emerging issues between groups has not showed statistically significant differences.

Conclusions: The implementation of the MCGP not only arise themes proposed by Breitbart´s model, but other themes emerge that patients consider also important. Taking in mind these results, we propose to explore these emerging themes in the development of MCGP in Spanish or in Latin American cancer patients, where the sociocultural aspects could play an important role in the construction of personal meaning.

Keywords: group therapy, cancer, meaning, psychotherapy.

35

Impact of preferred treatment decision making role on distress and quality of life.

Dr Jennifer Kilkus*

Wellstar Health System, Marietta, United States

Background: Increase in patient participation in decision making has led to a shift toward a collaborative approach to treatment communication. However, little is known about patient's preferred role in the treatment decision making (TDM) process and the impact of the discrepancy between preferred and actual TDM role. Methods: Participants completed questionnaires assessing distress, quality of life (QOL), and TDM preference as part of a larger study of cancer patients in a non-profit hospital system. Results: Participants (N = 94) were an average age of 57 (range = 26–80), predominately Caucasian (81.9%) and female (69%). The highest proportion of participants was diagnosed with breast (23%), prostate (18%), and ovarian (13%) cancers. Thirty-three percent of patients reported a wish to be active in the TDM process, 60% preferred a shared role with their physician, and 7% a passive role. When asked perceived actual role during their last TD, 28% reported an active role, 49% shared, and 23% passive. There were no significant differences on distress or QOL scores between those whose preference matched their actual TDM role and those that didn't. Conclusions: Despite no significant findings between TDM role and measures of emotional well-being, more participants reported a shared or passive role than desired during their last TD. This may impact other aspects of care and survivorship, such as satisfaction, decisional regret, or future treatment decisions. Future research should investigate the relationship between TDM role and other aspects of the cancer experience.

36

DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF THE DAILY FATIGUE CANCER SCALE (DFCS): Single-Item Questions for Clinical Practice

Mrs Louise Baussard*1, Dr Anne Stoebner-Delbarre2, Mrs Laurence Bonnabel3, Mrs Aurélie Gastou3, Mrs Marie-Eve Huteau2 and Pr Florence Cousson-Gélie1

1University of Montpellier 3, Laboratory Epsylon EA4556 Dynamics of Human Abilities and Health Behaviors, Montpellier, France;2ICM Val d'Aurelle, Epidaure, Prevention Department, Montpellier, France;3ICM Val d'Aurelle, Montpellier, France

Purpose: The Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) is a subjective symptom of fatigue that is the most present and disabling symptom of cancer disease. For helping caregivers in the understanding of the fatigue symptom, we develop the Daily Fatigue Cancer Scale (DFCS). The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a visual analogue scale for assessing daily CRF.

Methods: Firstly, we conducted interviews with caregivers, patients and scientists (N = 30) for generate items and choosing scale presentation. Secondly, we administered the final scale on a sample of 104 hospitalized patients for a cancer surgery. Patients also answered two standardized questionnaires, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) to compare if our scale is valid and measure the fatigue symptom, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) to be sure that our scale estimate psychological fatigue but not depressive symptomatology.

Results: Correlations provide a good construct validity of our scale with r = .886(p > .01) between our physical fatigue item and the physical fatigue dimension in the MFI, and confirm that we measure less depression symptoms that psychological fatigue (r = .768 for mental dimension of the MFI versus r = .678 for the CES-D). Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) curves shows good sensibility and specificity (>.80). Area Under Curve (AUC) allows a threshold for discriminate tired patients and give only 3% chance of being wrong in the diagnostic.

Conclusions The Daily Fatigue Cancer Scale is a good tool to identify exhausted patients and to improve their care.

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How to prevent fatigue in metastatic colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy? Fatigue trajectories and psychosocial factors

Mrs Louise Baussard*1, Pr Marc Ychou3, Dr Pierre Senesse3, Dr Faiza Khemissa5, Dr Laurent Mineur6, Dr Cécile Proust-Lima4 and Pr Florence Cousson-Gélie2

1Epsylon Laboratory E4556 Montpellier University Paul Valery, Montpellier, France;2ICM Val d'Aurelle, Epidaure, Prevention Department, Montpellier, France;3ICM Val d'Aurelle, Montpellier, France;4INSERM 0897, Bordeaux, France;5Regional Hospital Perpignan, Perpignan, France;6Sainte-Catherine Institute, Avignon, France

Background: The colorectal cancer (CCR) is the 2nd most frequent cancer in women, the 3rd in men and the second cause of death by cancer in France. Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) is a hopeless, persistent and subjective feeling of fatigue in connection with treatments, but there is a significant link between psychosocial factors and severe fatigue in cancer patients.

Objective: To identify fatigue trajectories in metastatic CCR patients undergoing chemotherapy. Our study will also aim in identifying the psychosocial determiners that may have an impact on fatigue evolution: emotional distress, control, coping and social support. 3 trajectories will reflect the different evolution of fatigue. We believe that a poor psychological adjustment to the disease, may contribute to an increase of fatigue over time.

Method: This study is a prospective multicentric trial including 300 patients with a follow-up of 6 months. Patients will be asked to fill in the following questionnaires: The Daily Fatigue Scale in Cancer, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Cancer Locus of Control Scale, the Ways of Coping Checklist, and the Social Support Questionnaire. The fatigue trajectories will be revealed thanks to mixed models and latent class analyses.

Conclusions The interest of studying trajectories of fatigue in cancer is to determine typical trajectories and to be able to explain these variations by psychological determiners. To study this symptom, focusing on pattern evolution, is an original approach in health research. The optimal way to deal with fatigue is to understand this complex symptom.

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Suicidal Thoughts in Cancer Patients Predict Increasing Anxiety and Depression Scores

Ms Mary Hughes*1 and Dr. Richard De La Garza, II2

1Ut Md Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, United States;2UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA

Background/Purpose: Someone with suicidal ideation is assumed to be depressed but not necessarily anxious. The current study was designed to evaluate the extent to which suicidal thoughts predict overall anxiety and/or depression scores.

Methods: All adult patients seen in the MDACC outpatient psychiatry clinic (June 2014–Jan 2016) who provided informed consent were included (N = 1,096). Assessment tools included the PHQ-9 to measure depression and the GAD-7 to measure anxiety. Suicidality was assessed as a categorical variable using question 9 (PHQ-9). Data reflect percentages or Mean ± S.D.

Results: In this cohort, patients were predominantly female (67%), White (76%), and ~54 years of age. The majority of patients (79%) endorsed “not at all” to PHQ question 9: “Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you experienced thoughts that you would be better off dead or hurting yourself in some way”. Compared to those who specified “not at all” (9.6 ± 5.2), patients who endorsed suicidal thoughts (several days, more than half the days, nearly every day) had increasingly higher levels of depression (15.2 ± 4.6, 16.9 ± 4.7, 21.6 ± 4.0, respectively; F3, 1092 = 114.5, p < .0001). Similarly, as compared to those who specified “not at all” (8.5 ± 6.0), patients who endorsed suicidal thoughts had increasingly higher levels of anxiety (12.1 ± 5.5, 14.2 ± 4.9, 16.5 ± 4.3, respectively; F3, 1091 = 45.9, p < .0001).

Conclusions: The data indicate that ~20% of all patients seen at the MDACC Psychiatric Oncology Clinic endorse some level of suicidal thoughts and that these individuals exhibit significantly greater levels of depression AND anxiety as a function of increasing levels of suicidality.

Funding: The Hackett Family

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Cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically-fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy: a prospective, case-control study

Mrs Cindy Borghgraef*1, Prof Yves Libert1, Dr Stéphanie Dubruille2, Prof Anne-Marie Etienne3, Prof Aurore Liénard1, Prof Isabelle Merckaert1, Prof Christine Reynaert4, Mr Jean-Louis Slachmuylder2, Prof Dominique Bron1 and Prof Darius Razavi1

1Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels, Belgium;2Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium;3Université de Liège, Belgium;4Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically-fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy.

Methods: We assessed 89 consecutive patients (age ≥ 65 years) without severe cognitive impairment and 89 age-, sex-, and education level-matched healthy controls. Cognitive compensatory processes were investigated by (1) comparing cognitive performance of patients and healthy controls in novel (first exposure to cognitive tasks) and non-novel (second exposure to the same cognitive tasks) contexts, and (2) assessing psychological factors that may facilitate or inhibit cognitive performance, such as motivation, psychological distress, and perceived cognitive performance. We assessed cognitive performance with the Trail-Making, Digit Span, and RL/RI-16 tests, psychological distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and perceived cognitive performance with the FACT-Cog questionnaire. A global composite cognitive score was calculated based on Trail Making, Digit Span and RL/RI-16 tests scores.

Results: In novel and non-novel contexts, average cognitive performances of healthy controls was higher than those of patients (both p < 0.001) and was associated with motivation (β = 0.410 and 0.430, respectively). Cognitive performance of patients was not associated with investigated psychological factors in the novel context, but was associated with motivation (β = 0.291) and psychological distress (β = −0.297) in the non-novel context.

Conclusions: Older, clinically-fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy demonstrated lower cognitive compensatory processes compared to healthy controls. Reducing distress and increasing motivation may improve cognitive compensatory processes of patients in non-novel contexts.

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Perceived Impact of Participation in a One-Time Expressive Arts Workshop

DNS, FAAN Adult Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist Patricia Nishimoto*1, MSN, BSN, Nursing Instructor Penny Morrison2, MAAT, BFA, ATR, Veterans Services Counselor Carolina Medina-Dupaix3, LCSW, Clinical Social Worker John Kim4, Medical Student Marci Chock5 and PhD, Clinical Psychologist (Associate Professor) Erin Bantum6

1Tripler Army Medical Center Department of Medicine, Honolulu, United States;2University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing & Dental Hygiene, Honolulu, United States;3State of Hawaii Office of Veterans Services, Honolulu, United States;4Tripler Army Medical Center, Department of Behavioral Health, Honolulu, United States;5University of Hawaii at Manoa, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, United States;6University of Hawaii Cancer Research Center, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Honolulu, United States

Background: This study examines the use of art to express the experience of the oncology journey of survivors and family members. Art can ‘bridge the gap between the conscious and unconscious, often providing a depth of clarity, understanding and empathy otherwise difficult to achieve through words alone’ (Shannon. ACM 2013; 88-959). The creation of art facilitates exploration of the internal emotional environment, self-awareness, emotional conflict and helps us to express unspoken and unconscious fears and concerns about the illness.

Method: This mixed methods study of 28 adult participants used the Emotional Thermometer, analysis of the art work, and participant interviews to assess the perceived impact of participation in the one-time expressive arts workshop.

Results: Statistical significance was found between pre and post workshop participation in three aspects of the Emotional Thermometer: distress (p = 0.007), anxiety (p = 0.003), and depression (p = 0.005). Analysis of artwork was done using the Silver Drawing Test and Drawing a Story which provides access to emotions and attitudes. Responses, on a 5-point rating scale, were scored by five investigators. Phenomenological analysis of the interviews identified four themes; environment (tranquil place to be), connection (good fellowship), emotions (roller coaster of feelings) and discoveries (you don't realize it's raining until you touch the tent).

Conclusions: Non-art therapist staff members conducted this one-time program with male and female survivors plus family members. This is a feasible strategy for both genders and can be successful in bringing patient care to the next level.

This project is supported by the Oncology Nursing Society, Hawaii.

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The role of psycho-oncology in cancer prevention

Dr Richard Fielding*1, Dr Phyllis Butow*2, Dr Monika Janda*3, Dr Kevin Stein*4 and Dr Zeev Rosberger*5

1University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China;2School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia;3School of Public Health & Social Work, University of Sydney, Australia;4Division Behavioural Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA;5Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

New improved genetic and classical diagnostic methods and treatments lead to diminished, boundaries between cancer risk factors, diagnosis, and prevention of first and subsequent cancers. In 2015, the publication “The missing piece: cancer prevention within psycho-oncology” raised awareness about prevention issues in the psycho-oncology community. Topics debated include whether psycho-oncologists should: mainly aim to prevent psychological problems or also lifestyle improvements; collaborate with public health specialists; focus on the most common preventable cancers only; further revise the expanded model given latest advances in genetic research; lobby for larger systems changes to keep people healthy rather than treat the sick; lobby for remuneration models for preventive services. In this symposium, Zeev Rosberger will give an “update on the expanded model of cancer prevention research in psycho-oncology since the 2015 publication”. Presentations will elaborate on practical applications: Richard Fielding “Evidence and need for residual symptoms prevention”; Kevin Stein “Application of health behavior change theory in health promotion and secondary cancer prevention in cancer survivors”; Phyllis Butow “Can psycho-oncology assist women who have to make difficult decisions including uptake of contralateral mastectomy and selective estrogen receptor modulators”; Monika Janda “Endometrial cancer patients lifestyle changes after cancer, and uptake of weight loss interventions depending on anxiety and depression”. The symposium shows that there is considerable activity by psycho-oncology clinicians and researchers in the field of cancer prevention. Further discussion is required to take advantage of the synergies between public health and psycho-oncology, and how to steer the preventive psycho-oncology agenda.

Supporting Abstract 1:

How do women decide about preventive treatments? Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after early stage breast cancer & selective oestrogen receptor modulators in women at high risk

Authors:

Phyllis Butow1,2,3, Kelly Phillips3,4,5, David Porter3,6,7, Brittany Agar1 2, Angelique Ralph1,2, Stephanie Tessen 1,2, Imogen Richards1,2, Kathy Tucker8, Lesley Andrews8.

1. Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group, U. Sydney

2. Psychology, U. Sydney

3. ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group.

4. Div. Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Centre

5. Dept. Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, U Melbourne

6. Dept. Medical Oncology, Auckland Hospital, NZ

7. Medical and Health Sciences, U Auckland, NZ

8. Familial Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, Australia.

Purpose: Women at high risk of breast cancer, or diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (BC), consider options to prevent future cancers or cancer relapse. Two separate studies investigated the utility of protection motivation theory and the theory of planned behaviour in explaining women's hypothetical decision-making.

Methods: 107 women at increased risk of BC and 400 women previously treated for BC, completed a questionnaire exploring hypothetical intentions to take selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) or undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), respectively. Demographic and disease variables, and theoretical constructs, were included as predictors.

Results: Women who believed SERMS or CPM would effectively lower their risk, and would not have many downsides, perceived greater social pressure to have SERMS or CPM, anticipated regret (if they developed BC having rejected SERMS or CPM), tended to avoid uncertainty, felt they could cope with SERMS or CPM, and felt they were at greater risk of BC - were more likely to declare an hypothetical intention to undergo SERMS or CPM. Overall the models explained 16–44% of the variances in intention. Women self-reported that risk reduction and desire for breast symmetry (CPM only) motivated a positive decision, while desire to avoid side effects or post-operative risks, low perceived risk, choosing another method of risk reduction and avoiding financial costs motivated a negative decision.

Conclusions: Women weigh up both positive and negative aspects of preventive therapy before making decisions. Clinicians should explore women's understanding and perceptions when assisting women to reach decisions.

Supporting Abstract 2:

How do women decide about preventive treatments? Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after early stage breast cancer & selective oestrogen receptor modulators in women at high risk.

Authors:

Phyllis Butow1,2,3, Kelly Phillips3,4,5, David Porter3,6,7, Brittany Agar1 2, Angelique Ralph1,2, Stephanie Tessen 1,2, Imogen Richards1,2, Kathy Tucker8, Lesley Andrews8.

1. Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group, U. Sydney

2. Psychology, U. Sydney

3. ANZ Breast Cancer Trials Group.

4. Div. Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Centre

5. Dept. Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, U Melbourne

6. Dept. Medical Oncology, Auckland Hospital, NZ

7. Medical and Health Sciences, U Auckland, NZ

8. Familial Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, Australia.

Purpose: Women at high risk of breast cancer, or diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (BC), consider options to prevent future cancers or cancer relapse. Two separate studies investigated the utility of protection motivation theory and the theory of planned behaviour in explaining women's hypothetical decision-making.

Methods: 107 women at increased risk of BC and 400 women previously treated for BC, completed a questionnaire exploring hypothetical intentions to take selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) or undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), respectively. Demographic and disease variables, and theoretical constructs, were included as predictors.

Results: Women who believed SERMS or CPM would effectively lower their risk, and would not have many downsides, perceived greater social pressure to have SERMS or CPM, anticipated regret (if they developed BC having rejected SERMS or CPM), tended to avoid uncertainty, felt they could cope with SERMS or CPM, and felt they were at greater risk of BC - were more likely to declare an hypothetical intention to undergo SERMS or CPM. Overall, the models explained 16–44% of the variances in intention. Women self-reported that risk reduction and desire for breast symmetry (CPM only) motivated a positive decision, while desire to avoid side effects or post-operative risks, low perceived risk, choosing another method of risk reduction and avoiding financial costs motivated a negative decision.

Conclusions: Women weigh up both positive and negative aspects of preventive therapy before making decisions. Clinicians should explore women's understanding and perceptions when assisting women to reach decisions.

Endometrial cancer patients’ lifestyle changes after cancer, and uptake of weight loss interventions depending on anxiety and depression

Monika Janda, Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Australia; m.janda@qut.edu.au

Supporting Abstract 3:

Background: Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in women, often strongly associated with obesity and lack of physical activity. Little is known about women's interest in lifestyle interventions after treatment.

Methods: The Teacup study enrolled 122 women 1–4 years after treatment. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (8-points cut-off for likely anxiety or depression), and interest in counselling or lifestyle interventions. We used baseline survey data and Chi-Square χ2 Tests compared women with high or low anxiety/depression.

Results: At a median of 2-years post-surgery, patients were on average 65 years (39–87), 51% living with a partner, 52% retired. Overall, 25% of women reported elevated anxiety, and 8% elevated depression levels. While women did not differ by anxiety or depression status in their interest in weight loss (43%), eating more healthily (47%), or physical activity (36%), women with elevated anxiety (63%) were more likely to be interested to learn how to manage stress compared to women with low anxiety (32%; χ2 = 5.7; p = 0.02). No woman with anxiety planned to return to work or study compared to 20% of other women (χ2 = 4.4; p = 0.04). The preferred format of lifestyle information was by mail (56%), SMS (37%) or telephone (31%), few were interested in group discussions (15%).

Conclusions: About 50% of the women were interested in lifestyle programs, and wanted to receive information by mail. Anxiety elevated the need for stress management programs, and diminished women's desire to return to work or study.

Supporting Abstract 4

Translation, Dissemination, and Implementation of Prevention Programs for Cancer Survivors: What We Know and Where We Need to Go

Kevin Stein, Ph.D. Vice President, Behavioural Research Centre, American Cancer Society

Due to treatment toxicities, cancer survivors are increased risk for a number of health conditions (e.g. late effects) compared to age/gender matched peers in the general population. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that healthy lifestyle behaviours (diet and physical activity) cannot only ameliorate symptoms of some conditions, but may also play an integral role in the prevention of others, as well as improve overall physical and emotional health. As such, investigators have developed interventions aimed at improving cancer survivors’ lifestyle behaviours. Such interventions have proven to be safe, effective, and acceptable to survivors. However, most interventions have been conducted in controlled clinical settings, with few having been implemented in community-based settings. Furthermore, restrictions in terms of types of interventions, characteristics of study participants, and other methodological limitations have hindered the generalizability of research findings and uptake of interventions at the community level. Issues of reimbursement and lack of clinical guidelines for post-treatment cancer survivorship care have also limited accessibility of such programs. Using examples (with data) from research studies, this presentation will address current challenges to moving evidence-based interventions into the community setting. The presentation will focus on the challenges to health behaviour change among cancer survivors, including moving lifestyle interventions from clinical settings to the public health setting (e.g. translational research), studying how best to implement such intervention programs in the community (e.g. dissemination and implementation science), exploring novel methodologies and use of e-health technologies, and investigating issues around the maintenance of behaviour change.

44

The effectiveness of adventure-based training in reducing fatigue and enhancing quality of life among childhood cancer survivors

Dr Ho Cheung William Li* and Dr Oi Kwan Joyce Chung

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Background/Objective: Insufficient participation in physical activity remains a common problem in survivors of childhood cancer. This study aimed to test the effectiveness of an adventure-based training program in reducing fatigue, improving physical activity levels and promoting quality of life among Hong Kong Chinese children cancer survivors.

Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted in a paediatric outpatient clinic of an acute hospital and the Children's Cancer Foundation. A total of 323 childhood cancer survivors were recruited. Subjects in the experimental group received a four-day adventure-based training programme. Subjects in the control group received the same amount of time and attention as the experimental group but not in such a way as to have any specific effect on the outcome measures. All subjects were assessed for the fatigue, muscle strength, physical activity levels and quality of life at baseline, 6 and 12 months after the start of intervention.

Results: Subjects in the experimental group reported significantly lower levels of fatigue (p = 0.02), but higher levels of physical activity (p < 0.001), muscle strength (p = 0.02) and quality of life (p = 0.05) than those in the control group at 6 and 12 months. Also, statistically significant differences were found in fatigue, physical activity levels, muscle strength and quality of life among subjects in the experimental group from baseline to 12 months.

Conclusions The adventure-based training programme was found to be effective in reducing fatigue, promoting regular physical activity and enhancing quality of life among childhood cancer survivors.

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Does mode of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychological adjustment?

Dr Annmarie Groarke*1, Dr Andrea Gibbons2, Professor Ruth Curtis1 and Ms Jenny Groarke1

1National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway City, Ireland;2Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom

Background: The number of women with screen-detected breast cancer is increasing, but it is not clear if these women experience the same levels of distress as women with symptomatic breast cancer. The current study compared stress and distress in women with screen-detected or symptomatic breast cancer at diagnosis and 12 post-diagnosis.

Methods: Ninety-two women with screen-detected breast cancer and 129 women with symptomatic breast cancer completed measures of perceived stress, anxiety, and depression at diagnosis and 12 months post-diagnosis. Women also completed a measure of cancer-related stress at 12 months post-diagnosis.

Results:

Obituaries

Obituaries collected from Dimmit County area Newspapers.

See Index for sort by date.

NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Quinney, Elizabeth Posey28 Aug 1912, Mercedes, TX10 Sep 2000, Gonzales, TXGonzales, TX13 Sep 2000, Gonzales Memorial ParkRobert PoseyFannie MooreW. Lawrence Quinney
Survived by: Husband - W. Lawrence Quinney, Son - Bill Quinney
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 37, September 14, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Quinney, William Lawrence Sr.20 Mar 1912, Gonzales Co., TX22 Jan 2001, Gonzales, TXGonzales, TX25 Jan 2001, Gonzales Memorial Park, Gonzales TXWilliam Eli QuinneyMamie KelloggElizabeth Posey
Survived by: Son - Bill Quinney
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 05, February 1, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Quintero, Emilio 21 May 1924, Luling, TX9 Dec 2003, Uvalde, TXUvalde, TX13 Dec 2003, St. Michaels Cemetery, Big Wells, TXJose Simon QuinteroMaria Carlota Rodriguez
Survived by: Daughters - Guadalupe Montes, Angelita Sepulveda, Rosalinda Garza, Estella Quintero; Sons - Luis Quintero, Manuel Quintero, Emilio Quinteri Jr., Raul Quintero, Ramon Quintero, Jose Quintero
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 51, December 18, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ralston, Frances Viola10 Jan 1930, Oklahoma10 Feb 2004, Kingsland, TXKingsland, TX12 Feb 2004, Sunrise Cemetery, Bristow, OK

John F. Ralston
Survived by: Sons - John Ralston, Bruce Ralston; Daughter - Rhoda Bridges
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 121 No 8, February 19, 2004
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Adrian M.16 Mar 1922, Knippa, TX6 Jan 1999, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX8 Jan 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXDiego RamirezIrene MartinezSerapia G. Ramirez
Survived by: Wife - Serapia G. Ramirez; Daughters - Maria R. Miranda, Herlinda R. Medina, Aurora R. Moreno; Sons - Andres Ramirez, Reynaldo Ramirez, Ramiro Ramirez, Jose Ramirez, Raul Ramirez, Roberto Ramirez, Juan R. Ramirez, Richard Ramirez; Sisters - Maria Sevilla, Manuela Lopez; Brothers - Alejos Ramirez, Jesus Ramirez, Eduvijen Ramirez, Leonicio Ramirez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 02, January 14, 1999Link: 4521
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Alejos 17 Jul 1917, Batesville, TX17 May 2002, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX20 May 2002, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXDiego RamirezIrene MartinezDominga Guardioja
Survived by: Daughters - Valvina R. Lomas, Romaldina Vargas, Romasa Ramirez; Sons - Manuel Ramirez, Roy Ramirez, Domingo Ramirez; Sisters - Maria Sevilla, Manuela Lopez; Brothers - Dionicio Ramirez, Jesus Ramirez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 21, May 23, 2002Link: 4522
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Apolonia R.19 Apr 1939, Asherton, TX3 May 2000, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX7 May 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXManuel RiosFelicita YsaisJose Mendez Ramirez
Survived by: Husband - Jose Mendez Ramirez; Daughters - Rosalinda Armendariz, Otila Ramirez; Sister - Christina Zamora; Brother - Manuel Rios
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 19, May 11, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Catalina G.30 Apr 1922, Maxwell, TX15 Feb 2003, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX18 Feb 2003, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXJose GuardiolaMaria De JesusDionicio Ramirez
Survived by: Husband - Dionicio Ramirez; Daughters - Ernestina De Leon, Rosalinda Vargas, Lupe Ramirez, Gloria Ramirez, Particia Zavala, Dora Alicia Balderas; Sons - Elpidio Ramirez, Mario Ramirez, Israel Ramirez, Juan Antnoio Ramirez; Brothers & Sisters - Simona Riojas, Serapia Ramirez, Christina Espinosa, Felipe Guardiola, Mario Guardiola, Pablo Guardiola, Mercedes Guardiola
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 08, February 20, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Christopher 14 Oct 1978, Carrizo Springs, TX16 Jun 1999, Grand Forks, MNGrand Forks MN21 Jun 1999, Grand Forks, MNFelix RamirezSusana Vargas
Survived by: Father - Felix Ramirez; Mother - Susana Ramirez; Daughters - August Dawn Ramirez, Anita Desiree Ramirez; Son - Joshua Ray Red Feather; Brothers - Felix Ramirez Jr., Alejandro Ramirez, Enrique Ramirez; Sisters - Florinda Ramirez, Sonia Bratton, Cecilia Ramirez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 25, June 24, 1999
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Cruz 3 May 1955, Carrizo Springs, TX12 Aug 1999, Houston, TXCarrizo Springs, TX16 Aug 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXAlejos RamirezDominga Ramirez
Survived by: Father - Alejos Ramirez; Brothers - Manuel Adrian Ramirez, Roy Ramirez, Domingo Ramirez; Sisters - Valvina Lomas, Romaldina Vargas, Tomasa Ramirez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 33, August 19, 1999Link: 4344
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Eduvijen M.17 Oct 1931, Winter Haven, TX20 Jan 2000, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX22 Jan 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXDiego RamirezIrene AguileraGenoveva De La Cruz
Survived by: Wife - Genoveva Ramirez; Sons - Eduvijen Ramirez Jr., Ismael Ramirez, Juan Ramirez, Jesse Ramirez, Martin Ramirez, Rene Ramirez, Adolfo Ramirez; Brothers - Dionincio Ramirez, Jesus Ramirez, Alejos Ramirez; Sisters - Romaldina Vargas, Maria Sevilla, Manuela Lopez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 04, January 27, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Irene S.29 Jun 1919, 19 Dec 2002, Carrizo Springs, TXAsherton, TX23 Dec 2002, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXAntonio SotoClemencia Garcia
Survived by: Sister - Refugia Rubalcava; Brother - Antonio Soto
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 01, January 2, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Juan B5 Mar 1940, St Perlita, TX5 Nov 2009, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX9 Nov 2009, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXGuadalupe RamirezGrancisca BeltranEster Zavala
Survived by: his wife, Ester (Zavala) Ramirez of Carrizo Springs; his son, Eduardo Ramirez of Crystal City; two sisters, Maria DeLa Cruz of Saginaw, Michigan and Lola Bays, also of Michigan; two brothers, Guadalupe Ramirez, Jr. of Michigan and Andres Ramirez of San Antonio; three grandchildren, Krysta Ramirez, Elyanna Ramirez, and Eleena Ramirez; and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 47, November 19, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Maria G.19 Jan 1923, Valley Wells, TX5 Jun 1998, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX8 Jun 1998, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXJuan GonzalezGuadalupe GarciaBrijido Ramirez
Survived by: Daughters - Ana Luisa R. Mendoza, Elsa R. Moyeda, Irma R. Ayala, Eloisa R. Ortega; Sons - Abelardo Ramirez, Jose Erasmo Ramirez, Rolando Ramirez; Sisters - Bertha Guillermo, Estefana Herrera, Odelia Espinoza, Elvira Pena, Josefa Gonzalez; Brother - Ascencion Gonzales
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 115 No 24, June 11, 1998Link: 4523
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramirez, Serapia G.14 Nov 1924, Lockhart, TX15 Apr 2003, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX18 Apr 2003, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXJose GuardiolaMarid de Jesus GarzaAdrian Ramirez
Survived by: Daughters - Maria Miranda, Herlinda Medina, Aurora Moreno; Sons - Andres Ramirez, Jose Ramirez, Reynaldo Ramirez, Raul Ramirez, Juan Ramon Ramirez, Richar Ramirez, Robert Ramirez; Sisters - Simona Riojas, Cristina Espinoza; Brothers - Felipe Guardiola, Mario Guardiola, Pablo Guardiola, Merced Guardiola
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 17, April 24, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramon, Catarina M.30 Apr 1914, Encinal, TX1 Feb 1999, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX4 Feb 1999, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXFrancisco MartinezMaria LealJuan P. Ramon
Survived by: Daughters - Francisca Ramos, Margarita Areola, Sulema Ramon; Sons - Vincente Ramon, Gregorio Ramon, Juan Ramon Jr., Francisco Ramon; Sister - Francisca Quiroz
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 06, February 11, 1999Link: 2033
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramon, Gregorio M.22 Dec 1935, Encinal, TX16 Jul 2001, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX19 Jul 2001, Mt. Hope CemeteryJuan P RamonCatarina Martinez
Survived by: Daughters - Juanita Perales, Angelita Morales; Sons - Bernardo Ramon, Gregorio Ramon Jr; Sisters - Francisca Ramos, Margarita Arreola, Sulema Ramon; Brothers - Juan Ramon Jr, Francisco Ramon
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 30, July 26, 2001Link: 4524
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramon, Guadalupe 7 Apr 1937, Asherton, TX27 Jul 2002, Carrizo Springs, TXCrystal City, TX31 Jul 2002, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXManuel RochaMaria MendozaJavier Ramon
Survived by: Husband - Javier Ramon; Daughters - Miroslava Acosta, Maria Elena Ramon; Sons - Randy Ramon, Erasmo Ramon, E.J. Ramon, Marcus Eric Ramon, Jesse Ramon; Sisters - Juana De Leon, Josefa Reyna, Juana Villanueva, Ramona Garza; Brother - Francisco Rocha
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 31, August 1, 2002
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramon, Virginio 11 Jan 1913, Carrizo Springs, TX24 Mar 1999, San Antonio, TXAsherton, TX27 Mar 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXJesus RamonTeresa Arredondo
Survived by: Relatives raised as children - Genaro Ramon, Isabel Palma, Jose Ramon, Magdalena Zavala
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 13, April 1, 1999Link: 4525
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramos, Emma 6 Sep 1925, Asherton, TX19 Sep 2002, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX21 Sep 2002, Marcelo RamosJuanita Chapa
Survived by Sisters - Rosa Pacheco, Antonia Flores, Rita Carrillo; Brothers - Lupe Ramos, Juan Jose Ramos
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 39, September 26, 2002
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ramos, Enrique C.15 Jul 1930, Asherton, TX1 Jan 2001, San Antonio, TXCrystal City, TX4 Jan 2001, Edgewood Cemetery, Crystal City, TXMarcelo RamosJuanita ChapaEmma G. Ramos
Survived by: Wife - Emma G. Ramos; Daughter - Gloria Moncada; Brothers - Guadalupe Ramos, Juan Ramos
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 02, January 11, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rangel, Esperanza I.5 May 1920, Buena Park, CA3 Dec 2001, Carrizo Springs, TX5 Dec 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXRosendo RiveraAmada LermaLeonides Rangel
Survived by: Daughter - Esperanza I. Mendoza; Sons - Anthony Martin, James Ortiz, Robert Ortiz, Edward Ortiz, Steven D. Rangel
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 50, December 13, 2001Link: 4526
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rangel, Felix 21 Feb 1925, Villa De Fuente Municipo De Piedras Negras, Coah,12 May 2000, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX16 May 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TX

Maria Antonio Rangel
Survived by: Wife - Maria Antonio Rangel; Daughters - Juanita Moreno, Maria Padilla, Yolanda Casiano, Lupita Rodriguez, Carmen Romo; Sisters - Concha Pruneda, Maria Elena Ramirez, Grepina Gaitan, Manuela Villarreal, Maria Besa; Brothers - David Rangel, Jesus Rangel
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 20, May 18, 2000Link: 4527
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rangel, Maria Consuelo4 Sep 1920, Laredo,TX14 Aug 1999, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX17 Aug 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TX

Trinidad G. Rangel
Survived by: Daughters - Maria Elena Garza, Graciela Lira; Sons - Juan Rangel, Mario Rangel, Santos Rangel; Sisters - Victoria Sepulveda, Maria M. Rios
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 33, August 19, 1999Link: 4345
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rankin, Vernon Leo11 Feb 1918, Asherton, TX, Carrizo Springs, TX4 Nov 1999, Hillcrest Cemetery, Uvalde TX

Mildred Lammons
Survived by: Wife - Mildred Rankin; Son - Robert Rankin; Daughters - Carolyn Driver, Sharon Easley; Brother - David Rankin
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 45, November 11, 1999Link: 4528
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rector, Anita 24 Aug 1908, 11 Aug 1999, Uvalde, TX14 Aug 1999, Hillcrest Cemetery, Uvalde TX
Bertha Stahmann RuschEarl A. Rector
Survived by: Son - Billy K. Rector; Daughters - Peggy Eueks, Joyce Galloway
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 33, August 19, 1999Link: 4529
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reddick, Sherry Howard18 Aug 1955, Carrizo Springs, TX30 Oct 2001, San Antonio, TXUvalde, TX2 Nov 2001, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXJames Carroll HowardBetty June RousePierre Zahoula
Survived by: Husband - Pierre Zahoula; Step-mother - Henrietta Howard; Daughters - Sherri Davenport, Stephanie Reddick; Sons - James Reddick, Travis Reddick; Brothers - Ken Howard, Gregg Howard, Brooks Howard
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 45, November 8, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reed, Mary L.19 Jun 1942, San Antonio, TX21 Apr 2002, Victoria, TXVictoria, TX25 Apr 2002, Memorial Park Cemetery, Victgoria, TXJurd I. TumlinsonGenevive FinleyHarley D. Reed
Survived by: Husband - Harley D. Reed; Daughter - Jeanie Jordan; Son - William Jordan; Brothers - Mike Tollett, Walter Tumlinson, Tim Tumlinson, Allen Coleman,John Tumlinson, Sonny Tollett
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 21, May 23, 2002
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Renfro, Martha Anita2 Jul 1922, Cline, TX25 Feb 2002, Round Rock, TXRound Rock, TX28 Feb 2002, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXJack BartlettBertha PinkstonElton Renfro
Survived by: Daughters - Mary Ellen Hill, Patricia Bolton, Cathy June Parker, Pam Renfro; Sons - Dennis Renfro, Elton Ray Renfro
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 10, March 7, 2002
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reyes, Carlos H.4 Aug 1965, Dallas, TX19 Jan 2000, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX21 Jan 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXFabian ReyesJuana H. Reyes
Survived by: Father - Fabia Reyes; Mother - Juana H. Reyes; Sisters - Elida Sistos, Rosa Leyva, Joann Benavides; Brothers - Joe Reyes, Raul Reyes, Fabian Reyes Jr.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 04, January 27, 2000Link: 4613
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reyes, Francisco Panalez III24 May 1969, Carrizo Springs, TX5 Jan 2009, Carrizo Springs, TX10 Jan 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXFrancisco Mejia Reyes JrRebecca Panalez
Survived by: his mother, Rebecca Reyes of Carrizo Springs; two daughters, Nicole Reyes of Carrizo Springs and Ashley Nicole Reyes of Carrizo Springs; three sons, Gerardo Reyes of Carrizo Springs, Stephen Francisco Reyes of Carrizo Springs, and Christopher Reyes of Carrizo Springs; three sisters, Abby Reyes of Carrizo Springs, Brenda Reyes of Carrizo Springs, and Sandra Enriquez of Carrizo Springs; one brother, Michael Reyes of Carrizo Springs; one grandchild, Jorge Luis Quintanilla, Jr. of Carrizo Springs; and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 3, January 15, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reyes, Francisco M. Jr.13 May 1949, Mexico30 Jun 2008, Crystal City, TXCrystal City, TX2 Jul 2008, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXFrancisco A ReyesConcepcion MejiaDiana Garcia
Survived by: his wife, Diana Garcia Reyes of Crystal City; three daughters, Avilene Reyes of Carrizo Springs, Brenda Reyes of Carrizo Springs, and Sandra Enriquez of Carrizo Springs; two Sons, Francisco Reyes. III of Carrizo Springs, and Michael Reyes of Carrizo Springs; three step-sons. George DeHoyos of Austin, Eddie DeHoyos of Crystal City, and Michael DeHoyos of Crystal City; four sisters. Olivia Luna, Maria Elena Uribe, Adalia Gloria, and Dora Elva Cabrera, all of Carrizo Springs; three brothers, Reynaldo Reyes, Arturo Reyes, and Armando Reyes, also all of Carrizo Springs; 17 grand children, 4 step-granchildren, 2 great-grandchildren, and numerous other relatives. Besides his parents, he was also preceded in death by a brother, Margarito Reyes of Houston.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 125 No 27, July 3, 2008
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reyes, Juana 21 Jul 1941, Carrizo Springs, TX8 Nov 2009, Carrizo Springs, TX14 Nov 2009, Marcos HernandezConcepcion DuranFabian A. Reyes
Survived by: her husband, Fabian a. Reyes of Carrizo Springs; three daughters, Rosa Leyva of Carrizo Springs, Joann Benavides of Corpus Christi, and Elida Reyes of Carrizo Springs; two sons, Joe Luis Reyes of San Antonio and Raul Reyes of Houston; three sisters, Carmen Bocanegra of Arlington, Oralia Faz of Oak Cliff, and Concepcion Hernandez of Dallas; 16 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren, and numerous other relatives. She was preceded in death by her parents; by two sons, Carlos Reyes of Carrizo Springs and Fabian Reyes, Jr. of Minnesota; and by a brother, Lupe Hernandez of Dallas.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 46, November 12, 2009Link: 4746
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Reyes, Maria 1 Jul 1914, Marion, TX31 Aug 2000, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX2 Sep 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXOton DominguezAntonia De Luna
Survived by: Daughters - Alicia Gonzales, Marta Silvas, Yolanda Sondate; Sons - Jose Mendoza, Juan Mendoza, Pedro Mendoza, Santiago Mendoza, Valentin Mendoza; Sisters - Juanita, Elvira, Maria, Josefina, Enriqueta; Brothers - Miguel, Desiderio, Agustin, Oton
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 36, September 7, 2000Link: 4530
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rhia, Charles "Rusty"10/7/1971, Crystal City, TX12 Jan 2008, Waco, TX1/15/2008, Charles RhiaMary Price
Survived by: Parents; sisters - Heather Riha Kimble, Vonda Riha Almand; uncle Bob Price; aunt Dawn Marburger
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 48, November 26, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rice, Oscar L.14 Aug 1931, Marfa,TX12 Jul 1998, San Antonio, TXCrystal City, TX15 Jul 1998, Benito Juarez Cemetery, Crystal City, TX

Lorena Martinez
Survived by: Wife - Lorena M. Rice; Sons - Oscar Rice Jr, Louis Rice, Jimmy Rice; Brothers - Fred Rice, Willie Rice; Sisters - Nora R. Barriga, Esther R. Gonzalez, Margarita R. Martinez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 115 No 29, July 16, 1998
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Riojas, Jose A.5 May 1953, Asherton, TX19 Apr 2007, Carrizo Springs, TXAsherton, TX23 Apr 2007, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXConcepcion RiojasMaria CardonaMary E. Martinez
Survived by: Wife - Mary E. Riojas; Daughter - Joann Sosa; Sons - Jose Riojas Jr., Ray Riojas; Sisters - Dominga Jaramillo, Nevolena Guerroro, Linda Villarreal, Dora Sifuentez, Nora Navarro, Rosa Aguirre, Lucia Galindo, Irma Vera; Brothers - Ricardo Riojas, Oscar Riojas, Gilbert Riojas
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 124 No 17, April 26, 2007
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Alfredo G.31 Mar 1937, Carrizo Springs, TX4 Feb 2001, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX7 Feb 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXIrenio G. RiosMaria GarzaMaria Elena Zuniga
Survived by: Wife - Maria Elena Z. Rios; Daughters - Sylvia Z. Rios, Guadalupe Z. Rios, Alicia Z. Rios, Maria Elena Rios; Sons - Rey Vallejo, Alfredo Z. Rios Jr., Arturo G. Rios, Irenio Z. Rios; Sister - Paula Hernandez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 06, February 8, 2001Link: 4531
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Enedina R.14 May 1925, Lockhart, TX12 Feb 2002, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX15 Feb 2002, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXSalvador RodriguezLorenza CapitioPablo Rios
Survived by: Daughters - Carmen R. Buenteo, Emma R. Ramirez, Rammy Cervantez; Step-daughters - Aurora R. Solis, Micaela Miranda, Victoria Rubalcava; Sons - Jesus Rios, Pablo Rios, Raul Rios, Gonzalo Rios, Jimmy Rios; Step-son - Enrique Rios; Sisters - Juanita Hernandez, Elena Hernandez; Brothers - Felis Rodrituez, Alfredo Rodriguez, Manuel Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 08, February 21, 2002Link: 4533
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Evaristo F.27 Oct 1905, Pearsall, TX4 Jan 2000, Lubbock, TXLubbock, TX6 Jan 2000, Resthaven Memorial Park, Lubbock, TX

Francisca Rodriguez
Survived by: Daughters - Emma R. Quevedo, Candida R. Martinez; Brothers - Manuel canales, Tomas Canales, Jesus Canales, Eulalio Canales; Sisters - Francisca C. Luna, Antonia C. Rodriguez, Maria C. Ramos
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 02, January 13, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Genoveva G.4 Jan 1921, Asherton, TX18 May 2000, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX22 May 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXAntonio C. GarzaAlbina BosquezLuis O. Rios, Sr.
Survived by: Daughters - Angelina G. Rios, Maria Olga G. Rios; Sons - Alfonso G. Rios, Ramon G. Rios, Luis G. Rios Jr.; Brother - O. B. Garza
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 21, May 25, 2000Link: 4534
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Julia L.20 Dec 1954, Carrizo Springs, TX4 Sep 2000, Laredo, TXCarrizo Springs, TX7 Sep 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXTelesforo LopezJosefa LopezDaniel Rios
Survived by: Husband - Daniel Rios; Mother - Josefa Lopez; Daughter - Christine Rios; Son - Daniel Rios; Sister - Angelita Nunez; Brother - Adolfo Lopez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 37, September 14, 2000Link: 4535
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Maria Elena Z.7 Jun 1941, Cruz, Mexico5 Apr 2007, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX10 Apr 2007, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXLaurenzio ZunigaOlivia CruzAlfredo G. Rios
Survived by: Daughters - Sylvia Rios, Guadalupe Rios, Alicia Rios, Maria Elena R. Briseno; Sons - Alfredo Rios Jr., Art Rios, Irenio Rios, Rey Vallejo; Sister - Maria del Carmen Lopez; Brothers - Roberto Monsivais, Jesus Monsivais
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 124 No 15, April 12, 2007Link: 4644
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, Nicolasa Sevilla10 Sep 1923, Brackettville, TX16 Oct 2001, San Antonio, TXCrystal City, TX19 Oct 2001, Benito Juarez Cemetery, Crystal City, TXPablo SevillaLeonides MaderasEsteban Rios
Survived by: Husband - Esteban Rios; Sons - Esteban Rios Jr, Ricardo Rios, Jose Angel Rios; Daughters - Paula Guerrero, Rachel Rodriguez, Olivia Ochoa; Sister - Maria S. Galvan
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 43, October 25, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rios, San Juanita Lesvia Galindo19 Jan 1947, Asherton, TX15 Jan 2011, Carrizo Springs, TXAsherton, TX19 Jan 2011, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXLuis GalindoRomana GonzalesRegino Rios
Survived by: her Husband - Regino Rios; Five Daughters - Eileen Riois, Debbie Rios, Dusty Rios, Doreen Rios, Mary Ann Guerrero; Two Sisters - Belia Barrera, and Rosarioi Vasquez; Five Brothers - Jaime Galindo, Baldemar Galindo, Martin Galindo, Anivar Galindo, Eloy Galindo.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 128 No 3, January 19, 2011
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Risinger, Clyde Stephen11 July 1942, Corpus Christi, TX14 Dec 2008, Ardmore, OK19 Dec 2008, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXClyde Carter RisingerMary Jean HankeJeannine Phillips
Survived by: his wife Jeannine Risinger; his mother Mary Jean Crawford; his daughter Michille Woods; 1 sister - Elizabeth King; 2 brothers - Tommy Risinger & Mike Risinger; 2 granddaughters - Nicole Woods & Rebecca Woods. Steve was preceded in death by his father Stephen Carter Risinger in 1984.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 125 No 52, December 25, 2008
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Ritter, Gladys Buck4 Jul 1928, Laredo, TX27 Mar 2001, San Antonio, TX
31 Mar 2001, Hilltop Cemetery, Tilden, TXGeorge Leroy BuckVirginia MulkersonJohn W. Ritter
Survived by: Daughter - Janice Lee Hinds; Son - Karl William Ritter
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 14, April 5, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Riuz, Manuel F. Sr.31 May 1923, Atascosa Co., TX27 May 2001, San Antonio, TXAsherton, TX31 May 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXMartin RuizCasiana FelanDolores Ruiz
Survived by: Daughter - Mary Ruiz Santos; Sons - Martin Ruis, Manuel Ruis Jr, Mario Ruiz; Sister - Brumilda Martinez; Brothers - Juan Ruiz, Martin Ruiz, Jose Guadalupe Ruiz
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 22, May 31, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivas, Maria H.10 Mar 1935, Mexico1 Mar 2000, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX3 Mar 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXBlas HernandezBernarda GonzalesCrescencio R. Rivas
Survived by: Husband - Crescencio R. Rivas; Daughter - Maria Maldonado; Son - Ramon Guadalupe Rivas
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 10, March 9, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivera, Alice 23 Jun 1949, Fargo, ND10 Jan 2009, Dallas, TXDallas, TX14 Jan 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXModesto GomezAdelfina BergaraRamon Rivera
Survived by: her husband, Ramon Rivera of Dallas; her father, Modesto Gomez of Carrizo Springs; one daughter, Veronica Rivera of Dallas; sons, Sergio Rivera of Dallas, and Gary Rivera of Dallas; two sisters, Helen Gomez of Carrizo Springs, and Virginia Criel of Carrizo Springs; nine brothers, Vicente Gomez of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Juan Gomez of Rolla, North Dakota, Ismael Gomez of Glyndon, Minnesota, Modesto Gomez, Jr. of Moorhead, Minnesota, Ramon Gomez of Monticello, Minnesota, Tirso Gomez of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Henry Gomez of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Jimmy Gomez of Moorhead, Minnesota, and Daniel Gomez of Moorhead, Minnesota; eight grandchildren and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 3, January 15, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivera, Gilbert B.7 May 1938, Gillett, TX5 Aug 2002, Carrizo Springs, TX7 Aug 2002, Encinal Cemetery, Encinal, TXCarlos RiveraCarmel BandaRosa Maria Rivera
Survived by: Wife - Rosa Maria Rivera; Mother - Carmel Banda Rivera; Children - Ida Sandra Barron, Gilbert Rivera Jr., Carlos Rivera, Rene Rivera; Sisters - Mitilde Pena, Mary Moreno, Esabel Galvan, Esmeralda Elizardo, Emily Smith
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 119 No 32, August 8, 2002Link: 4536
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivera, Gloria Palacios18 Sep 1931, Crystal City, TX25 May 2001, San Antonio, TX
31 May 2001, Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery


Survived by: Daughters - Elizabeth Rivera, Diana Sanchez; Son - Juitan Villarreal; Brother - Elias Palacios
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 22, May 31, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivera, Nicolasa 5 Mar 1920, Artisia Wells, TX31 Oct 2009, Carrizo Springs, TXAsherton, TX2 Nov 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXJose RiveraSantiaga Sanchez
Survived by: three sons, Juan J. Rivera of Victoria, Ramon Rivera of Dallas, and Armando Rivera of Carrizo Springs; 12 grandchildren, 32 great-grandchildren, and 5 great-great-grandchildren as well as numerous other relatives. She was preceded in death by her parents, her brothers and sisters, and by a daughter, Maria Guadalupe Rivera.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 45, November 5, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rivera, Ramon G.27 Sep 1918, Carrizo Springs, TX18 Mar 2000, San Antonio, TX
21 Mar 2000, Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery

Gloria Rivera
Survived by: Wife - Gloria Rivera; Daughters - Lilly R. Pulido, Diana Villarreal Sanchez, Victoria L. Rivera; Sons - Ramon L. Rivera, Juan Rivera, Ricardo S. Ganda; Sister - Arminda Amaya
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 13, March 30, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robbins, Don Richard7 Apr 1917, Walters, OK2 Jul 2003, Uvalde, TXUvalde, TX3 Jul 2003, Sunset Memorial Park, San Antonio, TXCharles RobbinsMyrtle RobbinsPauline Moulder
Survived by: Wife - Pauline Robbins, Daughter - Darlyne Milstead; Sister - Ruthie Chester
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 28, July 10, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robinson, Maria P1 Jul 1915, Asherton, TX4 Jan 2010, Asherton, TX6 Jan 2010, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton TXFebronio PenaConcepcion DeLeon
Survived by: her son, Gregorio P. Tapia of Asherton; five grandchildren; eight grandchildren; numerous nephews, nieces and other relatives. Besides her parents and her husband, she was also preceded in death by numerous brothers and sisters.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 127 No 1, January 7, 2010
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robledo, Rafael H18 Feb 1948, Asherton, TX26 Nov 2009, Carrizo Springs, TX30 Nov 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXSantos RobledoFelipa HerreraMaria D. Robledo
Survived by; his wife, Maria D. Robledo of Carrizo Springs; two sons, Reynaldo Robledo of La Pryor and Ricardo Robledo of Carrizo Springs; three sisters, Hermelinda Gonzales of Crystal City, Elida Lopez of Lubbock, and Sylvia Ortiz of Carrizo Springs; four brothers, Juan Robledo of Asherton, Natividad Robledo of Corpus Christi, Alfredo Robledo of Crystal City, and Lupe Robledo of Carrizo Springs; six grandchildren, numerous nephews and nieces, and other relatives. Besides his parents, he was also preceded in death by a son, Rafael Robledo, Jr.; by a sister, Gloria Robledo; and by a brother, Jesus Robledo.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 48, November 26, 2009Link: 4747
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robledo, Rafael H18 Feb 1948, Asherton, TX26 Nov 2009, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX30 Nov 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXSantos RobledoFelipa HerreraMaria D. Meza
Survived by: his wife, Maria D. Robledo of Carrizo Springs; two sons, Reynaldo Robledo of La Pryor and Ricardo Robledo of Carrizo Springs; three sisters, Hermelinda Gonzales of Crystal City, Elida Lopez of Lubbock, and Sylvia Ortiz of Carrizo Springs; four brothers, Juan Robledo of Asherton, Natividad Robledo of Corpus Christi, Alfredo Robledo of Crystal City, and Lupe Robledo of Carrizo Springs; six grandchildren, numerous nephews and nieces, and other relatives. Besides his parents, he was also preceded in death by a son, Rafael Robledo, Jr.; by a sister, Gloria Robledo; and by a brother, Jesus Robledo.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 49, December 3, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robles, Eusebio 5 Mar 1923, Mexico6 Mar 2000, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX9 Mar 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXEduardo RoblesJuana Gomez
Survived by: Brother - Basilio Robles
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 11, March 16, 2000Link: 4537
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robles, Marina M.26 Dec 1918, Carrizo Springs, TX29 Dec 2008, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX2 Jan 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXPedro MartinezDolores GonzalezAndres Robles
Survived by: her son Andres and his wife Maria Odilia, Robles Jr., Seven daughters: Guadalupe Gonzalez, Julia Robles, Paula Robles, Maria (Mauro) Ybarra, Dolores Rivera, Gloria (Jesus) Hernandez, Maricela Garcia; One sister Jesusa Rangel. She was preceded in death by her husband Andres, and her parents, Three sons: Juan Manuel, Jesus, & Omar, and a daughter Gloria Robles.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 2, January 8, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Robles, Ramon 19 Nov 1953, Leonard, TX26 Mar 2010, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX29 Mar 2010, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXEmilio RoblesJulia De La Rosa
Survived by: one daughter, Christina Robles; three sons, Ramon Robles, Jr., Jesse Robles, and Eduardo Robles; two sisters, Guadalupe Robles Gonzalez of Carrizo Springs, and Juana Robles Jaime of Asherton; one brother, Jose Emilio Robles of Carrizo Springs; and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 127 No 13, April 1, 2010
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rocha, Gumecindo G.15 Jan 1943, Carrizo Springs, TX7 Sep 2003, Crystal City, TXCrystal City, TX10 Sep 2003, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXMaximo RochaSantos GuevaraConcha A. Rocha
Survived by: Parents - Maximo Rocha & Santos Guevara; Ex Wife - Concha A. Rocha; Daughters - Sonia Rocha Pargas, Ida Cortez, Elva Rocha, Anita Barbosa, Conchita Garcia, Jema Taylor, Joanna Lerma; Sons - Gumecindo Rocha Jr., Ruben Rocha, Adam Rocha, Armando Salinas Rocha; Sisters - Sara DeLeon, Gloria Trevino, Yolanda Tejada, Juanita Urban; Half-Sisters - Carme Rocha, Anaberta Diaz; Brothers - Armando Rocha, Guadalupe Rocha, Ben Rocha, June Rocha
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 120 No 37, September 11, 2003
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rocha, Isabel G.5 Jul 1947, Carrizo Springs, TX29 Oct 2001, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX1 Nov 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXMaximo RochaSantos GuevaraIsabel D. Rocha
Survived by: Wife - Isabel D. Rocha; Father - Maximo Rocha; Mother - Santos Rocha; Daughters - Dalia R. Vasquez, Norma R. Gonzalez, Maria B. Itrube, Marisel Rocha; Sons - Gerardo S. Rocha, Maximo S. Rocha, Isabel S. Rocha Jr, Felipe Antonio Rocha; Sisters - Gloria Trevino, Sara DeLeon, Yolanda Tejada, Juanita Urban, Ana Bertha Rocha, Carmen Rocha; Brothers - Gumecindo Rocha, Armando Rocha, Guadalupe Rocha, Benigno Rocha
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 45, November 8, 2001Link: 4538
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rocha, Maximo 5 Apr 1920, Carrizo Springs, TX11 Jun 2007, Carrizo Springs, TXCrystal City, TX15 Jun 2007, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Carrizo Springs TXEmeterio RochaAnita RamirezCarmen Balboa
Survived by: Wife - Carmen B. Rocha; Daughters - Sara DeLeon, Gloria Trevino, Yolanda Tejada, Juanita Urban, Carmen Guajardo, Anna Diaz; Sons - Armando Rocha, Guadalupe Rocha, Beningo Rocha; Sisters - Tomasa Balderas, Virginia Robles, Tana Estrada, Eloisa Estrada, Ofelia Flores; Brother - Nicolas Rocha
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 124 No 25, June 21, 2007Link: 4646
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Aurora H.3 Sep 1922, Cotulla, TX19 Sep 2009, Carrizo Springs, TXBig Wells, TX23 Sep 2009, St. Michaels Cemetery, Big Wells, TXManuel HernandezSantos CantuJose Rodriguez
Survived by: three daughters, Guadalupe Menchaca of Big Wells, Elva Sandoval of Chicago, and Ida Pantaleon of Chicago; three sons, Jose Rodriguez, Jr. of Big ells, Juan Rodriguez of Chicago, illinois, and Alberto Rodriguez of Big Wells; three sisters, Benita Perez of Big Wells, Emma Alvarado of Cotulla, and Isabel Hernandez of Austin; 22 grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren and great-grea-grandchildren as well as numerous other relatives. Besides her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Jose Rodriguez; by a son, Eloy Rodriguez; and by a sister, Amelia Solis.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 39, September 24, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Cira S7 Aug 1928, Protland, TX26 Feb 2011, San Antonio, TXAsherton, TX, Encarnacion SosaPetra FuentesRamon Rodriguez
Survived by: her daughter, Maria Adalia (and husband, Ricardo) Martinez; her son, Ramon (and wife, Odett) Rodriguez, Jr; her brother, Jose Sosa; seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 128 No 9, March 2, 2011
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Elena 18 Aug 1917, Floresville, TX10 Apr 2001, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX13 Apr 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TX


Survived by: Cousins - Amparo Barrera, Petra Coronado, Emilia Esquivel, Lupe Musquiz, Alicia Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 16, April 19, 2001Link: 4540
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Elisa C9 Jul 1943, Carrizo Springs, TX11 Oct 2009, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX15 Oct 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXTomas CastroRosa ScottJesus D. Rodriguez
Survived by: her daughter, Patricia Martinez of Carrizo Springs; her son, Mario Daniel Rodriguez of Carrizo Springs; three sisters, Juanita Rodriguez of San Antonio, Amelia Muniz of Wooddale, Illinois, and Valarie Vargas of Austin; two brothers, Tomas Castro of Carrizo Springs and Julio Castro of Carrizo Springs; four grandchildren, Christopher B. Martinez, Mark J. Martinez, Jose D. Rodriguez, and Geri Leigh Rodriguez; and numerous other relatives. Besides her parents and her husband, she was also preceded in death by four brothers, Henry Scott, Robert H. Scott, Agustin Torres, and Guadalupe Castro.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 42, October 15, 2009Link: 4748
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Elodia A.26 Mar 1935, Asherton, TX21 May 2009, Carrizo Springs, TX23 May 2009, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXNicolas ArredondoNicolasa ReyesLeonardo P. Rodriguez
Survived by: three daughters, Diana Dunbar of Carrizo Springs, Norma Alaniz of Carrizo Springs, and Inelda Rodriguez of Carrizo Springs; one son, Eugene Rodriguez of Carrizo Springs; two sisters, Dora Rocha of Houston, and Juanita Sifuentes of Houston; five brothers, Victor Arredondo of Houston, Alberto Arredondo of Houston, Alejandro Arredondo of Houston, Osvaldo Arredondo of San Antonio, and Erasmo Arredondo of Sugarland; 15 grandchildren, 5 great-grandchildren, and numerous other relatives.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 22, May 28, 2009Link: 4649
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Eloy H.4 Jan 1945, Cotulla, TX20 Jun 2007, Big Wells, TXBig Wells, TX23 Jun 2007, St. Michaels Cemetery, Big Wells, TXJose S. RodriguezAurora Hernandez
Survived by: Mother - Aurora H. Rodriguez; Daughters - Isabel, Marisol, Ana; Sons - Eloy Jr., Fidencio; Sisters - Guadalupe Menchaca, Carmen Menchaca, Elba Sandoval, Aida Pantelleon; Brothers - Jose Rodriguez, Juan Rodriguez, Albert Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 124 No 26, June 28, 2007Link: 4652
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Ernesto S.26 Jan 1921, Dimmit Co., TX7 Aug 2000, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX10 Aug 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXEduardo RodriguezAdelaida SuarezNinfa G. Rodriguez
Survived by: Wife - Ninfa G. Rodriguez; Sons - Luis Ernesto Rodriguez, Ricardo Rodriguez, Herberto Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 33, August 17, 2000Link: 4541
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Fred 9 Sep 1960, Elgin, IL9 Apr 2011, Carrizo Springs, TX13 Apr 2011, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXSantos GomezFrances Rodriguez
Survived by: his mother, Frances R. Vargas; his father, Santos Gomez; two sisters, Margarita Gomez and Rosa Gomez ; four half brothers, Bobby Gomez, Johnny Gomez, Andy Gomez, and Santos Gomez, Jr.; and numerous other relatives. He was preceded in death by a sister, Maria Gomez.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 128 No 15, April 13, 2011
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Gilberto G.4 Nov 1957, Carrizo Springs, TX, Houston, TX31 May 2000, Ernesto S. RodriguezNinfa G. RodriguezLilia Elizabeth Castaneda
Survived by: Wife Lilia Elizabeth Rodriguez; Son - Gilberto Rodriguez; Father Ernesto S. Rodriguez; Mother - Ninfa G. Rodriguez; Brothers - Luis Ernesto G. Rodriguez, Ricardo G. Rodriguez, Herberto G.Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 24, June 15, 2000
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Jesus D "Chi-Chi"2 Oct 1937, Carrizo Springs, TX27 Sep 2009, San Antonio, TXCarrizo Springs, TX1 Oct 2009, cJesus RodriguezGuadalupe DuranElisa Castro
Survived by: his wife, Elisa C. Rodriguez of Carrizo Springs; one daughter, Patricia Martinez of Carrizo Springs; one son, Mario Daniel Rodriguez of Carrizo Springs; one brother, Urbano Torres of Salem, Oregon; four grandchildren, Christopher B. Martinez, Mark J. Martinez, Jose D. Rodriguez and Geri Leigh Rodriguez; and numerous other relatives. Besides his parents, he was also preceded in death by three brothers, Roberto Duran, Edward Rodriguez and Lionel Rodriguez.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 126 No 40, October 1, 2009
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Juan De Luna13 Sep 1950, Morelos, Coah., MX4 Jun 1999, Houston, TXHouston, TX7 Jun 1999, Pantion San Juan de Mata, Allende, Coah., MXAlejo De LunaVictoria RodriguezEvanelia Hernandez
Survived by: Wife - Evanelia Hernandez De Luna; Father - Alejo De Luna; Mother - Victoria De Luna; Daughter - Sylvia De Luna; Sons - Juan Alejo De Luna, Eddie De Luna; Sisters - Olga De Luna, Consuelo Lopez De Luna, Norma Rizer
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 23, June 10, 1999
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Juan D.11 Jun 1922, Asherton, TX17 Nov 1999, Asherton, TXAsherton, TX19 Nov 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXGregorio RodriguezMaria GalvanJulia Juarez
Survived by: Wife - Julia Rodriguez; Daughter - Olga Espinoza; Sons - Alfonso Rodriguez, Juan Rodriguez, Mario Rodriguez, Jose Luis Rodriguez, Armando Rodriguez, Alfredo Rodriguez, Antonio Rodriguez, Alejandro Rodriguez; Sisters - Juanita De Leon, Josefa Reyna, Guadalupe Ramon, Juanita Villanueva, Ramona Garza; Brother - Jesus Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 47, November 25, 1999Link: 4542
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Julia J.9 Jan 1924, Valley Wells, TX3 May 2000, Carrizo Springs, TXAsherton, TX6 May 2000, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXRegino JuarezAnselma CobarrubiaJuan D. Rodriguez
Survived by: Daughter - Olga Espinoza; Sons - Alfonso Rodriguez, Juan Rodriguez, Mario Rodriguez, Jose Luis Rodriguez, Armando Rodriguez, Alfredo Rodriguez, Antonio Rodriguez, Alejandro Rodriguez; Sisters - Angelita Torres, Casimira Mendez, Estefana Rodriguez; Brother - Hilario Torres
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 117 No 19, May 11, 2000Link: 4543
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Julian 20 Jan 1924, Loma Vista, TX16 Feb 1999, Carrizo Springs, TXCrystal City, TX18 Feb 1999, Benito Juarez Cemetery, Crystal City, TXLeonardo RodriguezJovita HuertaDaria Correa
Survived by: Wife - Daria Rodriguez; Sons - Alfonso Rodriguez, Carlos Rodriguez, Filiberto Rodriguez; Daughter - Jovita Villarreal
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 08, February 25, 1999
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Leonard P. (Leon) Jr.15 Oct 1935, San Antonio, TX23 Oct 1999, Carrizo Springs, TXCarrizo Springs, TX26 Oct 1999, Guadalupe Cemetery, Carrizo Springs, TXLeonardo RodriguezMaria PenaElodia Arredondo
Survived by: Wife - Elodia (Lola) A. Rodriguez; Mother - Maria Bustamante; Daughters - Diana Dunbar, Norma Alaniz, Inelda Sifuentes; Son - Eugene A. Rodriguez; Half Sister - Beatrice Tuley; Half Brother - Joe Rodriguez
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 116 No 43, October 28, 1999Link: 4539
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Louis C11 Oct 1928, San Antonio, TX17 Mar 2011, San Antonio, TXSan Antonio, TX21 Mar 2011, Holy Cross Cemetery, San Antonio, TXJesus RodriguezAgapita RodriguezJuanita T. Rodriguez
Survived by: his wife of 60 years Juanita T. Rodriguez. His children continue his legacy; Leticia Rodriguez married to Robert Rodriguez, Jr., Ceasar Rodriguez married to Mary Carmen Rodriguez, Marysa Ramon married to Roland Ramon. He is leaving loving memories in his six grandchildren; Cassandra, Bobby, Cesar, Andrez, Roel, and Juliana. Surviving is his only surviving sister Conch Munoz and numerous family members and friends.
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 128 No 12, March 23 2011
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMotherSpouse
Rodriguez, Manuel Jesse24 Dec 1929, Asherton, TX12 Sep 2001, San Antonio, TXSan Antonio, TX15 Sep 2001, Guadalupe Cemetery, Asherton, TXGregorio RodriguezMaria RochaMary M. Rodriguez
Survived by: Wife - Maria M. Rodriguez; Sons, Jesse Rodriguez, Joe Rodriguez, Robert Rodriguez; Daughters - Mary Helen Martinez, Linda Noriega, Laura Garza; Sisters - Juanita Villanueva, Ramona Garza, Lupe Ramon, Juanita DeLeon, Josefa Reyna
Source: Carrizo Springs Javelin, Vol 118 No 38, Sep 20, 2001
NameBornDiedResidenceBuriedFatherMother

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